56

Yes they can but unless your neighbor has the required technical expertise, its highly doubtful. To view incoming and outgoing traffic you need specific software to monitor network packets and the tech knowledge to actually do it. Most routers only keep a syslog and unless they are using software like wireshark to monitor/capture your packets, they cannot ...


48

If you get a VPN and use that for browsing, that will hide all your traffic from both your neighbour and their ISP.


35

Preface: I consider this question to be a false dichotomy and an inversion of the burden of proof. One of the core tenets of building secure systems is that you minimise the attack surface, and resist additional components and features wherever possible to keep in line with this. As such, if one cannot identify a strong reason to include a component in the ...


30

What about using tor? Keep in mind that your speed will be affected. As other people said, using any private mode in your browser is not going to be of any help. EDIT : The slowdown heavily depends on the network topology, the number of nodes, how much traffic the nodes are handling and what you are downloading. Here you can find some explanations about ...


30

Many of the news were just sensational news, not actual. There have been reports surfacing after this that security agencies monitor xbox and playstation communications. It came up as a playstation was found in one of the Paris attackers flats. It was baseless and been debunked quickly (https://motherboard.vice.com/read/how-the-baseless-terrorists-...


26

Yes they can actually. What it boils down to is that they can see which websites you are running by looking at: Clear HTTP traffic DNS requests sent One thing you could do is purchase an encrypted VPN and run all your internet traffic through the VPN. This way your neighbours will not be able to see what you are doing.


21

You could try another old-fashioned way and disclose something specific on the phone, and nowhere else, that would be of interest to those monitoring you. If that information is later used you will know your phones are being monitored.


21

Yes. This is the reason that SslStrip works. (Okay, one of the reasons.) HTTP is in the clear. So the 301 is in the clear as well. Anyone who's listening with e.g. Wireshark will be able to see this. (Try for yourself on the same host. It's easy.)


16

connections dropping frequently, rate limiting occuring, and packet loss Without knowing whether your connection resets are injected TCP reset packets or a result of dropped packets, it's hard to say whether you're actually having your data acted on or just having connection issues. It is entirely conceivable that your line or equipment aren't working quite ...


15

Yes, the ISP can see the whole URL as the request before the redirect to HTTPS is plain HTTP. HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS) is trying to fix that by having the server notify the browser to only connect via HTTPS. Of course, the very first request to a HSTS enabled site is still unencrypted, because the browser doesn't know about the HSTS policy of ...


13

There has been an enormous amount of research into using machine learning techniques for anomaly detection, i.e., to scan network traffic and detect intrusions. However, this research has had very little practical impact. These techniques have seen little deployment and are rarely used in practice. Why not? There are a number of reasons. First, these ...


13

You cannot. Not all chipsets/wifi drivers support monitor mode. Broadcom is known for lacking in open source drivers functionality support. It is already public knowledge the RPi 3 current driver implementation does not support monitor mode. PSA: The Raspberry Pi 3's embedded WiFi card does not support promiscuous mode. If you are buying a replacement, ...


12

When my laptop is using a network I don't control (basically anything that's not home) it wears pretty red socks to reroute all traffic into the SOCKS5 proxy built into OpenSSH and then to a server I rent anyways for my website to protect my traffic. You can use tor as well but I intensely dislike tor (for reasons off topic here). This is the socks_up ...


12

In practice, it depends on the router they're using (and, specifically, on the firmware it's running). Basically all home WiFi routers have the technical ability to log visited URLs, as long as their firmware includes such a feature (and it's not exactly a complicated one). The main questions are: whether the router firmware supports such a logging ...


11

I'm assuming that what you're doing is related to ethical pen. testing. If you have no legitimate control over your target, you have 3 options Haxoring your target: Attempt to gain access to the target machine by exploiting some vulnerabilities in the machine itself, or the operator of the machine. Big Man in the Middle (Between your target and the servers ...


11

Your point 2 is a bit inaccurate. The PTK is never sent over the air in WPA; it is computed from the PMK, an AP nonce, a client nonce, the AP MAC address, and the client MAC address (this is "key exchange", but the PTK never gets transmitted). Without the PMK, an attacker who sniffs the data can't discover the PTK without doing a brute-force attack (...


10

What do we look for? -- A Security Expert. To Hire. That is a 100% serious answer -- If you are asking this question you need someone in house who can answer it. Selling a "security monitoring service" without an expert on staff is a Bad Idea. You will make a mistake, it may result in a client being compromised, and you won't have the expertise on hand to ...


9

If you delete your Tor data directory, Tor will randomize how it builds new circuits and picks new entry nodes. However, the behavior you are seeing is intentional. Tor has affinity to a small set of entry nodes, called entry guards. These guards help reduce the chance that you are assigned an entry node which is malicious, because your computer is only ...


9

Here is a suggestion for your case. You need an extra laptop with both cable connection and wifi connection. You, then bridge the two connection and enable the Internet Connection sharing function from the cable to the wifi. By that way, your laptop's wifi become an access point. Next, you install Wireshark on this computer and set it to monitor the wifi ...


8

You've got most of the likely approaches mentioned in your question but here's a couple of points on them. Usage. This is the easiest way to start blocking traffic, and what the a lot of ISPs seem to go with most. Have a "fair use" policy which is based on bandwidth and then start taking action against users to go significantly over it. Unfortunately in a ...


8

A keylogger can use literally any form of communication to send its data back to the attacker. Common methods: FTP upload Email IRC HTTP POST Connect-back (i.e. attacker connects to a service listening on your machine) P2P network (e.g. Gnutella or BitTorrent) Custom protocol running over TCP or UDP, directly to the attacker. Note that any of these ...


8

Since you do not state what kind of "help" you want, I will have to guess. So I suggest the following: Talk to your father. With "talk" as in "talking", not "shouting reproaches". Your father installed this monitoring system for a reason, probably a mixture of making him less worried about your well-being, and a safety feature against the re-enacting of ...


8

TL;DR: Change your passwords Enable two-factor authentication to prevent attackers from changing your password Warn your sysadmin You should change your passwords ASAP. From a machine that you trust. What good is it going to do that the attacker can still log in too? What if they find a way to change the password, too? Any suspicious activity should ...


7

In order to trace back the source you first need to figure out which device is generating the traffic. The best, in my opinion, would be to set up a flow collector of some sort. There are generally two ways to do this, Exporting flows from the device Software analysis to generate flows Most high end network gear will generate some kind of flow record, such ...


7

The simple answer is that you can't. The tracking and tapping is done transparently at the service provider. Only ways I can think of: Breach the service provider's network and find out for yourself. Bribe a service provider employee to give you a list of taps.


7

Sensor placement can be very tricky as there are loads of variables to consider. At minimum, you should take into account Classification level of monitored resource Network design System throughput Personnel time (for management and analysis) Resource availability Throwing all of those into a blender and turning on high for a few minutes will give you some ...


7

Have a look at tshark. It's like wireshark, but then for commandline. Just install it with apt-get. A tutorial on how to use it can be found here. You can easily filter for http with it. To capture http traffic: tshark -R "tcp.port == 80" -r /tmp/capture.cap If port 80 is your http port. If you don't know the port just capture everything and you can ...


7

The short answer is in comments and @msw's response. There is, literally, no way that you can use the library's (or anyone else's) systems and/or infrastructure and have a 100% guarantee of anonymity. If the system and/or network owner is determined to be able to monitor and log your activity, there is nothing you can do to prevent it except simply not use ...


7

I don't see how TLS 1.3 should harm the current way TLS interception is done. Currently TLS interception is done by having a man-in-the-middle proxy. Connections from client to server will be handled by this proxy the following way: Create TLS connection between proxy and server. Create a new server certificate (often just a clone of the original ...


6

From the outside, eavesdropper can passively access everything that is sent "in the clear" as part of the initial steps of a SSL/TLS connection. This includes the fact that SSL is used, the protocol version, the agreed-upon set of cryptographic algorithms, the server certificate, often the intended server name... Once the initial "handshake" is complete, ...


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