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5

If your device isn't connected to the network, either because WiFi is turned off or because your device isn't configured to automatically connect to the network, nothing on that network can affect your device. However, an attacker may create a network with the same SSID and PSK as one that your device recognizes, such as the WiFi network used at your ...


4

I think you have some X/Y conflicts in your reasoning behind the question. Modems do not need an operating system. What you are calling a modem (with a web interface) is far more than a modem, which requires an "operating system". The operating system you are supposing is not a "whole operating system" but an embedded form of an operating system (likely ...


2

It's completely normal that a site is only available with the domain, and it's vital for shared hosting: before the Host: header was added in HTTP 1.1 (RFC 2068, 14.23 from 1997, updated in RFC 7230, 5.4) every site required an own IP address, and before SNI (RFC 6066, 3) it was pretty much the same with HTTPS. This same Host: header could be used in your ...


2

No, in order for network traffic to be handled correctly, it needs to have MAC and IP addresses. Encrypting these would prevent switches and routers from sending responses to the broadcasts back to the broadcaster. However, you can use a VPN, which will allow you to connect to a different network, with a different IP address, but an outside observer will ...


2

There are many possible ways to retrieve the data harvested. Depending on the type of attack (automated / targeted), the intended goal of the attacker and the means available to the attacker. Often, one of these is chosen (this is not an exhaustive list!) Use a Command & Control system that selectively tells the malware what to do and where to send data....


2

One obvious way this could happen is if your WiFi is not very secure, and a lot of neighbors are using it. That's probably not the case - this is a very large list of local devices for that, and people often set a network they don't control as using the "public" firewall profile (it's the default, in fact), which (by default) turns off Windows Networking (...


2

There is nothing specific to XP that poses a threat to other machines on the network. The fact that it can be controlled by a malicious actor is the threat that it poses. With XP, this threat is more likely than with other operating systems and patch levels. So, putting aside the specific operating system, the threat is that it can be used to pivot and ...


1

If you are behind a NAT, which you assume in your question, it's not a problem to publish your private IP. Only devices in your private network can use your private IP to connect to your device. If someone tries to connect to your private IP from outside your private network, he will reach someone else (or not even that), because there is no relation ...


1

In short, there is no risk when your device is not connected to the network unless the hacker changes the SSID and password of the WiFi to one of the saved (and enabled auto-connect) ones in your device; which is rare, especially when the hacker has not targeted you. But to be on the safe side: forget (remove) all saved WiFi on your device, use VPN for any ...


1

The external Alfa wifi adapters are recommended because they use wi-fi chipsets that support all the necessary operations (e.g. packet injection and monitor mode) that are required for full use of the aircrack-ng suite, and the latest Kali distros support them out of the box without much faffing around. This reply explains it more fully.


1

Let me put it like this, Nowadays malware are often connected to a CNC ( Command and Conquer ) Domain, they often communicate with this domain to inform the hacker that the malware is now active and is pending for future commands to execute, this is part of the sophisticated approaches that is being used today. The malware enters your environment. Calls ...


1

It is highly advisable to use two factor authentication in jump servers. The whole purpose of having a jump server is to segregate a "more trusted" set of resources from a "less trusted" set of resources. For example, by virtue of your desktops being exposed to Internet (and potentially phishing via email), they constitute a less trusted zone. The bar to "...


1

It is likely that there is a backdoor for the devs/support (ZTE) to connect to [of course we would all like if they would stop doing this...]. As for being open to the internet that is the fault of your ISP. They can and should lock down the device itself so that the telnet, http, https, and ssh logins are only accessible from the ISP's CPE management VLAN....


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