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74

You can send out a packet with whatever IP address you like. Then, one of the routers along the way might decide the packet makes no sense (it is a "martian packet") and discard it. Consider this: | 192.1.1.1 +------------------- GW4 ...


14

Probably not, depending upon whether or not your ISP is implementing Ingress Filtering: a technique used to ensure that incoming packets are actually from the networks from which they claim to originate. If your ISP is implementing Ingress Filtering, then your forged packets will be dropped as they traverse your ISP's network, and will never reach your ...


13

Even in the absence of ingress filtering as described in the other answers, IP spoofing will hit another hurdle: the TCP 3-way handshake, and possibly higher-level handshakes. TCP is the basis for many of the most common protocols, including HTTP, FTP, SMTP, POP3, IMAP and their TLS-secured counterparts, as well as SSH, and many many more. When you attempt a ...


7

The security model in UNIX is traditionally centered around having hardware and network controlled by the network administrators and then having unprivileged users separate from these administrators on the network. In other words: the network and the hardware are considered trusted because they are controlled only by a few selected administrators. This ...


5

I think this computer is connected to domain environment domain controller should be 2008 R2 or higher version. Therefore these ports are needs to open in client side. Sometimes computer might be previously connected to domain and changed to work-group. Read this Article.


5

Shodan doesn't authenticate with the device at all so most likely the device added authentication after it was already crawled/ indexed. The screenshot in Shodan isn't real-time. It was taken when the crawler visited the IP. You can use our new website to see the timestamp of when the data was collected (top right corner of the banner). And you can click the ...


3

Security is always a balance between risks and needs. TLS terminating reverse proxies are typically put in front of some service on the same machine or to systems in the same LAN. As long as this LAN is sufficiently controlled (i.e. only some system administrators can make changes, no "common" employees have access) the risk can be acceptable. If ...


2

I know how Buffer Overflows work You have to learn a little more about that... in order to do them do you have to be on the same WIFI as your victim. That's not even close to be correct. You need to send a packet to a specific device on a specific port. No, this is normal network traffic. Therefore, unless port forwarding was enabled on that specific ...


2

If access control is done in the application layer and it's a HTTP-based application, you might be able to bypass the check by forging the relevant HTTP headers (e.g. X-Forwarded-For, True-Client-IP, or X-Real-IP).


1

Your public IP address, if issued dynamically, cannot be switched until your ISP decides to. Static IP addresses assigned by your ISP can be switched, but your internet connection won't work unless the specific IP address has been assigned to you and in your IP range/scope. Note dynamic IP addresses typically are issued using consumer products. static IP ...


1

Any device on your network may be able to monitor unencrypted traffic traveling over your local network, whether passively or actively. A router is no exception to this. I do not imagine that this is something ISPs normally do, as it is likely to raise quite a few eyebrows. However, if your ISP is compromised or malicious, it is possible that they could ...


1

It is very unlikely this is the case. More than likely you're seeing results from previous scans. Or as Rory said, default results.Shodan tells you when the last time a scan was run against an asset, you can get an indication from this.


1

I had the same feelings as you regarding the default selection being set to public. After reading the other answers to this question I didn't really feel like they directly addressed your question around why Public is set to the default. So, I've done some testing and have found the following: The default selection is based on the state of your current ...


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