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30

Again, it's all about the threat model! Technologies are just technologies and can be used both for good and for evil. DNS over HTTPS (DoH) intends to solve the privacy concerns there are with unencrypted DNS, whereas DNSSEC can solve the integrity concerns without a need for encryption. Together with DNS over TLS (DoT) they are all fighting the threath of a ...


12

I've heard the argument against DNS-over-HTTPS that it is supposed to be a security nightmare for network defenders because it enables encrypted DNS over port 443, compared to DNS-over-TLS which goes through port 853. These network defenders are possibly corporate environments that rely on plaintext DNS inspection to enforce policies. Assuming that devices ...


5

You're right that their argument makes no sense, but it's not supposed to. It's just supposed to derail DNS-over-HTTPS, which is the approach that is actually taking off because it's less likely to be blocked by existing middlebox junk. Assuming the queries are to well-known open public nameservers, it's equally easy to add new rules to block them regardless ...


2

You could also use a travel router which supports openwrt, in most cases they have enough space to install tor. There are also cheap single board computers with two ethernet connections. What you are looking for is called a transparent proxy: https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/doc/TransparentProxy It boils down to installing and configuring tor, ...


2

According to the manual, if Remote Assistance is enabled, than outsiders can access your router management via the external IP address: So, it is possible, but is disabled by default, and appears to reset itself to disabled after a reboot. You should check your configuration as shown to be sure.


2

Yes, ISP's have the ability to arbitrarily block or throttle traffic based on the source of the traffic, or other factors. This is what net neutrality aims to prevent. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality.


1

A point that the other answers have only lightly touched on is that the user themselves might want to block certain DNS queries. For example, I use Pi-Hole on my home network to block DNS queries that are known to serve advertisements. Though outbound DNS queries are blocked, a device could potentially use DoH to circumvent that.


1

Yes, it absolutely is. You could use e.g. Raspberry Pi or any OpenWrt capable router. In addition to that, there's even commercial Tor hardware routers like Anonabox, InvizBox & NetAidKit.


1

If you connect to the company VPN through your routers VPN the source IP seen by the companies VPN is the exit of your routers VPN. This way your company will not see the real IP address, assuming no other leaks exists. But, the company will see the properties of the IP address from the VPN exit. It can find out that it is not an IP address given by your ISP....


1

OLD thread; new information. BAD news for stun servers. I just located this website. while searching for an answer to whether I should allows some of the STUN NAT TRAVERSAL hits snort is getting. Currently all blocked. After reviewing the website I decided that the odd issue cause when my wife and I are BOTH using our cell providers VoIP service while at ...


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