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For this kind of attack you could use for example Responder.py Please, bare in mind that in order to make it work over the internet it would be necessary to: Enable outbound SMB connections on the server that you plan to attack. NAT the port 445 on the attacker computer and ensure that no firewall is blocking it. Once those two conditions are true you can ...


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Vidarlo's answer is mostly right, but, incidentally, there was one fatal flaw in the protocol: the protocol was intentionally designed to allow replays to some degree. In particular, it was designed to allow retransmissions of message 3 in the handshake to succeed. But who's to say that it's the original client retransmitting the frame instead of an attacker?...


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Because the protocol is built to protect against that. whereas when you wanna login to your wifi you would type in your password and the password would be encrypted then sent to the router which would decrypt it using a key This is not how it works, on many levels. The password is never sent over the air, and it's a more complicated protocol, with multiple ...


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If there was a standard, easily answerable way to make a local network "absolutely secure", most of the community here would not have jobs. It's not nearly that simple. Network security is incredibly complex. And the environment, the people using it, and the people attacking it are constantly changing, adapting, and evolving. Can an attacker from ...


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Your question is a bit "wide". The attack that you described is plausible. Of course and as you said there might be different ways of accessing: Deprecated software with available exploits exposed to the internet could open a door to attackers Phishing attacks could be another vector of attack It is hard to explain all the different alternatives ...


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An interface is a property of the current system and not a property of the transferred data. Therefore there are no information in the packet which allow to specify the interface which should be used by the receiver or which should be shown as used by the receiver (i.e. different interface shown as actually used). This does not mean though that an attacker ...


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Nothing prevents an attacker from getting at least one IP packet through to a destination IP address behind a firewall if the hacker spoof's a whitelisted IP address for the packet's source IP address. SO The attacker won't get any packets back, because any response IP packets will be routed to the spoofed IP address (where they might flood the network ...


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I see a number of answers here about the use of binding IP addresses to loopback interfaces. To be clear, this is not uncommon. It's actually something that is done quite often, for example to create a virtual IP address floating that can move (automatically or manually) from one machine to another with a high availability protocol. The loopback interface is ...


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I have to give a Callback URL to receive some sort of validation, to use an API. I assume that you are talking about a callback URL as in this scenario: this will be the URL where the server will redirect the browser to after a successful authentication. Note that the server cannot directly access localhost from outside and usage of VPN does not matter. But ...


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Localhost is the name that each computer (most computers) has on its loopback interface. You should see this interface as an interface that is attached only to your local system. By definition, the whole 127.0.0.0/8 (or ::1/128 for IPv6) subnet is reserved for this interface. Only your own computer can access this network. If your service only listens to the ...


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