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1

This is mainly a policy issue. An higher being has decreed “Thou shall not have torrents on this network”. Seeing no way to effectively block only torrents, you block all ports. Now, certain applications no longer block. They should request that to be changed and you should relay that request to that higher being: Application X, which is needed by jdoe for ...


2

Assuming ISP gives only 1 external IP and you have few devices that use this IP That doesn't happen. There's a network address translation in between. Every device has its own IP address. That NAT device won't just "randomly" forward things to the devices it hides. So, only the NAT device (which you call "router", but it's really not a ...


0

If you connect together two LAN ports from the routers A and B you are connecting just the switches, you are not using the routing capabilities between those boxes. If you want to segregate the networks, you should at least use a different network and media and introduce some security rule. Trying to implement security by merely configuring routing rules ...


0

Ripple20 is a group of vulnerabilities (19 of them), each one with its own considerations. To identify the vulnerabilities you need some response from the devices, which can be obtained from a scanner like nmap, but since Wireshark is a passive tool, it may not help by itself to identify the vulnerable devices. More information of each one of the 19 vulns ...


2

Is there any way to use an external form (like the one above) to send a malformed GET request with POST data to achieve this CSRF A GET request with a body has no meaning. To cite RFC 7231 section 4.3.1: A payload within a GET request message has no defined semantics; sending a payload body on a GET request might cause some existing implementations to ...


1

But, it seems Windows does not allow modifying mac addresses to universal ones (i.e., UAA's) (...) What is the reason for this restriction? Are there security implications if this was not the case? Marginal implications, but only if you consider changing a MAC address to be a security problem. Whilst it's not expected to happen frequently, it can happen and ...


5

It is difficult to answer this question, because we don't have any insights on the way of thought of those at MicroSoft. However, as you said, there are two types of MAC's: a universally-administered address (UAA) and a locally-administered address (LAA). UAAs get the MAC-ID from the vendor; it contains the vendor's OUI. Although you can, you should never ...


1

You might want to consider writing a pluggable authentication module (PAM) that you can use with OpenWRT. From the Wikipedia article linked above, you can see: A pluggable authentication module (PAM) is a mechanism to integrate multiple low-level authentication schemes into a high-level application programming interface (API). It allows programs that rely ...


0

Can you give me brief idea where do I start Start with understanding sockets and studying other protocols. Some of the resources I can redirect you to are: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/18249847/how-to-build-a-protocol-on-top-of-tcp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i05pSG0d8Rg https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0155064 ...


1

By "secure", I'll assume you mean secure as in devices on one network are not able to communicate with devices on the other network. In your scenario, you are physically connecting two networks together, since router A's network is plugged into a switch port on router B. This means that they are both part of the same broadcast domain and link-local ...


-1

the loopback interface is supposed to be reserved by the IP protocol, as well as the 127.0.0.1 IP address, if you change the system's loopback address, this may break something else, now or in the future. those are reserved for a reason. I don't think it is a good idea to change such basic config to solve a common problem, it may be healthier for the system ...


0

While I can't think of a reason to use such a configuration, I also can't think of any security issues with it. As long as you intend to make the services available to all attached networks and publicly as you mentioned, there shouldn't be an issue. Regardless of the configuration, you may benefit from a host-based firewall to ensure only the intended ...


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