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0

It the absence of Signalling firewall(SS7,Diameter and GTP) in the receiving network, if an attacker uses a software that has the capability to send SS7 Map messages. The attacker can send Map messages that are expected from SMSC of external network towards the receiving network. The attackers can send MAP messages with spoof CgPA such as ATI to get the ...


15

I have experience securing DICOM in an identical situation so I'll focus on that. Assuming you're using properly configured environment (Autorun disabled, frequently updated Antimalware, etc.) then CDs are relatively safe. The same cannot be said for USB drives. We used a burner PC for USB drives. These discs are usually created by a PACS system (Picture ...


2

A dedicated machine on a separate VLAN with Internet access to update virus definitions. Then SFTP to a dedicated Linux VM that would also be running an AV instance and if you can help it possibly even several different AV's like ESET + CLAM for example. Then after it's scanned again and validated clean to push that data or have the data pulled into your ...


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It all depends on what you actually do with the data. A bunch of bits sitting on a disk is just that: a bunch of bits. It needs to be somehow executed in order to become malware and pose a threat to your network. This could be done in a couple of ways: windows allows autorun on removable media. Mitigation: change ingestion machine to Linux or carefully ...


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Yes you can. MitM attacks consist of sitting between the connection of two parties and either observing or manipulating traffic. A classical and well known MITM would involve ARP poisoning, which can only be executed on the same subnet, meaning in this scenario you can't do it from another network. This doesn't hold true if for example you have taken ...


-1

I'd suppose he has an option in BIOS "Wake on USB" activated. If it is activated and you move a mouse occasionally, the PC will turn on.


1

This is old, but you are right. The default is idiotic. Point one is that allowing any Inbound-initiated traffic is a risk. Point two is that you might enable it on a Private or Domain network where you have a reasonable trust of other devices. Point three is that you would almost never trust it on a Public network. There are quite a few apps that request ...


2

If you nmap the public IP of a cloud SQL instance, it looks like this: $ nmap -Pn -p 3306,3307,5432 35.197.181.190 Starting Nmap 7.70 ( https://nmap.org ) at 2019-07-13 01:11 AEST Nmap scan report for 190.181.197.35.bc.googleusercontent.com (35.197.181.190) Host is up (0.020s latency). PORT STATE SERVICE 3306/tcp filtered mysql 3307/tcp open ...


2

When you can configure the ISP router to run in bridge mode and connect a second router behind the ISP one, you can manage all your port forwarding rules yourself. Make sure that DHCP is disabled on the ISP router and enabled on your own router. This might be done automatically when the ISP router is put in bridge mode. Is this a good or bad idea? This ...


3

This is a broad question, as there are several different ways to assess the security of Ethernet ports. However, there are a few things that are usually covered in this type of scope. The first (and most straightforward) thing to test is whether any sort of Network Access Control is in place. If you're being asked to assess the security of a port, there is ...


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Another advantage is that, according to RedHat, it reduces performance spikes associated with the timestamp generation.


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I would not recommend this from two perspectives: GPDR The username makes someone personally identifiable in many logs, everytime not only IP but also a name is logged when a DNS-query is made by the application. This violates the data minimization principle of GPDR, in a case where a server log is exposed to a third party you have way more affected ...


4

X Y Problem Challenge: A better long term solution is to create a mapping of PCs to user and physical location. This is actually a CIS Top 20 Recommendation and gives you a lot of opportunities to build off of as you mature your process. Asset matrices are crucial to a lot of security processes. That being out of the way - for your specific question: The ...


0

Without of the general, the login need the correct username and the related password. It means the hacker need to guess the correct of two parts: the two-dimensional problem. If hacker can easily guess the valid username and the problem would be a one-dimensional. In your case, hacker can guess the username is JD, john, johndoe and other if computer is JD ...


0

If there is a direct mapping from machine names to user names, you are publishing valuable information to a hacker that has potentially gained access to your network. This especially true if usernames are being actively safeguarded elsewhere, for example, by not using them in company email addresses. Obfuscating the name somehow would decrease this risk, ...


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It's not. WPA-Enterprise and WPA-PSK will ultimately create a PTK key to be used in the TKIP algorithm, because it is WPA, therefore less secure than WPA2, whether it is WPA2-PSK or WPA2-Enterprise. Enterprise just offers encryption for the 4-way handshake, such as PEAP, or use of certificates, so WPA-Enterprise is arguably more secure than WPA-PSK but will ...


1

You may find your home router/access point has this functionality built-in in the form of a Guest Wi-Fi network which is isolated from the rest of your LAN. Take a look at your router's documentation etc.


4

Buy a small OpenWRT router with a WAN ethernet port and LAN wifi and/or LAN ethernet port. Plug the WAN port of your OpenWRT router on your home network. Plug your work computer on the LAN port of your small OpenWRT router. Configure OpenWRT router's firewall with a strict ruleset allowing only internet access and denying every access to your LAN. And that'...


0

Using IPv4, some zeros can be "optionnal" if easily guessable: ~$ ping 192.1 PING 192.1 (192.0.0.1) 56(84) bytes of data. ^C --- 192.1 ping statistics --- 2 packets transmitted, 0 received, 100% packet loss, time 1027ms ~$ ping 192.168.1 PING 192.168.1 (192.168.0.1) 56(84) bytes of data. ^C --- 192.168.1 ping statistics --- 1 packets transmitted, 0 ...


2

This is a relic of the original Internet addressing scheme, now retronymed 'classful' and obsolete almost 3 decades. See e.g. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/29285954/wsastringtoaddress-thinks-1-2-3-is-a-valid-ip-address or more officially http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/inet_addr.html . Note that 0.0.0.0 itself, in whatever ...


1

There are multiple approaches an attacker can use for host discovery. I believe netdiscover uses ARP requests for host discovery, which operates on the Ethernet protocol (see https://github.com/alexxy/netdiscover). Other tools like nmap operate at higher protocol layers (ICMP, TCP/IP, UDP/IP, see https://nmap.org/book/man-host-discovery.html). A solution ...


2

The description is likely misleading and confusing. Looking for this kind of problem on the internet suggests that a response to a DNS request originating from your local system was blocked, since the content of the response suggested that you've tried to visit some "Fake Tech Support Site". This might not have been a deliberate choice by you but might ...


0

There is so many solution for that. But yes. A hacker would use packet sniffing to find out Mac address. Even if you use encapsulation or encryption. Just the wasted time is different. The best way is to keep WiFi range inside your required room.


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To me there 3 possibilities: Endpoint surveillance program, one that is hidden from the user. Even with admin privilege, you might have missed it. For all i know it could be custom made, or or part of the OS. Real world observation, people talk. Firewall/ traffic monitor. Someone maybe just saw flashgames.com coming from a certain IP address and made the ...


0

The details have of course changed with time and technology. For many years the final launch code deep inside the ICBM missle sites was "00000000" 20 years Launch Code. The logic was that it was a very difficult assignment for constantly rotating crew in the bunkers and they needed something they could remember. It has been standard policy in the U.S. to ...


1

If you are behind a NAT, which you assume in your question, it's not a problem to publish your private IP. Only devices in your private network can use your private IP to connect to your device. If someone tries to connect to your private IP from outside your private network, he will reach someone else (or not even that), because there is no relation ...


0

It's no problem at all. It's like disclosing you live on apartment 201. There's countless buildings having the apartment 201, so it's impossible to tell where you live from that information alone. Disclosing your private IP address means the same: in lots and lots of places, there will be a device with the same internal IP address as yours, so that ...


0

Is it insecure to publish the private IP addresses of my devices? In short NO. Considering the internet(especially ipv4 addresses) gets brute forced all the time,publishing PUBLIC ip addresses of your device's shouldnt be considered insecure.If your device is internet facing then a Defence in Depth approach should be used rather than hiding your I.P(if ...


0

Private IP addresses for both versions (4/6) are totally exposable (there is no risk in exposing them) as a matter of security; and it is basically because there is no way-back having just a private IP to the system which is using that private IP.


4

I think you have some X/Y conflicts in your reasoning behind the question. Modems do not need an operating system. What you are calling a modem (with a web interface) is far more than a modem, which requires an "operating system". The operating system you are supposing is not a "whole operating system" but an embedded form of an operating system (likely ...


-1

Generally, scanning for WiFi networks is done passively by your device. This means that a router broadcasts information (such as the name of the network, authentication method etc.) and your device listens. These networks show up in a list which you can chose to connect to, but the router does not know your device is there until it tries to connect. So being ...


1

In short, there is no risk when your device is not connected to the network unless the hacker changes the SSID and password of the WiFi to one of the saved (and enabled auto-connect) ones in your device; which is rare, especially when the hacker has not targeted you. But to be on the safe side: forget (remove) all saved WiFi on your device, use VPN for any ...


6

If your device isn't connected to the network, either because WiFi is turned off or because your device isn't configured to automatically connect to the network, nothing on that network can affect your device. However, an attacker may create a network with the same SSID and PSK as one that your device recognizes, such as the WiFi network used at your ...


2

One obvious way this could happen is if your WiFi is not very secure, and a lot of neighbors are using it. That's probably not the case - this is a very large list of local devices for that, and people often set a network they don't control as using the "public" firewall profile (it's the default, in fact), which (by default) turns off Windows Networking (...


2

No, in order for network traffic to be handled correctly, it needs to have MAC and IP addresses. Encrypting these would prevent switches and routers from sending responses to the broadcasts back to the broadcaster. However, you can use a VPN, which will allow you to connect to a different network, with a different IP address, but an outside observer will ...


1

The external Alfa wifi adapters are recommended because they use wi-fi chipsets that support all the necessary operations (e.g. packet injection and monitor mode) that are required for full use of the aircrack-ng suite, and the latest Kali distros support them out of the box without much faffing around. This reply explains it more fully.


0

I think all you could know from such an attack (if the attacker is somewhat skilled) is that there's some connection outgoing that you potentially wouldn't want. There are many ways of how an attacker can receive data and still remain anonymous, here are some examples: Mixnet Virtual private network Using email services based in countries that likely won't ...


2

There are many possible ways to retrieve the data harvested. Depending on the type of attack (automated / targeted), the intended goal of the attacker and the means available to the attacker. Often, one of these is chosen (this is not an exhaustive list!) Use a Command & Control system that selectively tells the malware what to do and where to send data....


1

Let me put it like this, Nowadays malware are often connected to a CNC ( Command and Conquer ) Domain, they often communicate with this domain to inform the hacker that the malware is now active and is pending for future commands to execute, this is part of the sophisticated approaches that is being used today. The malware enters your environment. Calls ...


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