Hot answers tagged

362

This is actually an interesting new field in infosec - reputation management. Employers, Law Enforcement and other government agencies, legal professionals, the press, criminals and others with an interest in your reputation will be observing all online activity associated with your real name. These "interested parties" (snoops) are usually terrible at ...


75

Using your real name does not cause any harm to you. You do't have to pay for bad deeds done by an impostor. So, using your real name online is not a bad practise, it depends on your wish. But the information you share is the real key. Let us say that you have a blog or social network account with your real name. And you'd share information like the places ...


67

Using your real name is not only safe, it's important for you to do so. Just bear in mind that you don't want to simply attach your name to all your activities, you want to build and cultivate your online identity. Take the sad case of hapless, hopeless Rick Santorum. He was (and possibly still is) a politician with hopes for fame and power and sights on ...


46

Sadly, whether or not to use your real name online may depend on your gender: One study found "that chat room participants with female usernames received 25 times more threatening and/or sexually explicit private messages than those with male or ambiguous usernames". There have been numerous cases of prominent female bloggers being harassed and threatened,...


30

TL;DR: Behave in the same way on the internet as you would in the street outside your house (probably) - be consistent about who you are (you shouldn't have to compromise on your core values), keep your clothes on, don't drive while drunk, don't walk up to a stranger and give them your pin number, take reasonable precautions to ensure your safety, never go ...


21

Personally, I use my real name online or one of a select few handles that are easily and fairly reliably identified to my real name with a simple Google search. I also have friends who will give me nothing but their handle even after we've been friends for years. There is no right or wrong answer, it really comes down to personal comfort with your online ...


11

First, it's not the same if you have a common or unique name and if your male or female. Among the danger of using your real name online are stalking, bullying, identity theft, doxxing, etc. Please note that not using your real name online will not protect you from those, it only makes it a little bit harder and with other protective measure will hopefully ...


10

First, some comments I'll be frank here. A lot of your setup is poorly thought out or outright dangerous. For example, using a proxy after Tor (it's not TOR) can greatly decrease anonymity as you now have a centralized exit point (even with the use of rotating proxies). This is exacerbated by using a VPN, since now rather than having a protective chain of ...


7

1.Are those three processes (in)appropriate or am I missing any step/process of the whole thing? Do you have a need to inspect SSL encrypted traffic? Depending on where your WAF is positioned in your network, you may need a process to handle certificate provisioning and renewal with respect to how the WAFviews traffic. I separate it into these areas: ...


5

Using your real name online increases your vulnerability, and constrains your behavior. Being outspoken invites trolling. It's all good fun, until lighthearted harassment and death threats start getting real. You might face 200 pizza deliveries, or wake up to a SWAT raid. It may also have long-term consequences. Joel Silver notes: "What you say on line ...


5

A thing to consider is that the answer to your question depends on how common your name is. For example, there are only a handful of people in the world with my name, so if I use my name, chances are that the name can be correctly traced back to me. If your name is James Smith, then tracing the use of your name back to you becomes much more difficult. So ...


3

Here are the reasons I know why Pastebin is popular in terms of doxing among Malicious actors : It can handle large text files Easy to use Doesn’t proactively moderate postings Publishing there doesn’t require registration Its heritage is rooted in IRC networks They might be other reasons I'm not aware of. This SE site community should comment/edit this ...


3

What you say on line lives forever. The number of miscreants, peer aggressive competitors and general lack of ethics seems a very good reason to keep your thoughts associated with a nom de guerre. Linked-In exists for trading flattery and putting a very professional 'foot' forward for future HR reviews. A ambiguous photo or post can cost more than imagined ...


3

I've seen this done on old Compaq servers. The side panel had a pin that fit inside the power switch. When the panel was opened, the pin came with it, shutting off power. In fact, the system would not even power on without that side panel (more specifically, the pin) in place. It was quite a surprise when I was called in to service a server off-hours and I ...


2

You could standardize on all secret questions being number based. Then, when the questions are asked, they could include a bit on the end to add or subtract some. So for instance, the questions would be: What is the last four of your social security number plus 11? What is the street number of the house you grew up in, minus 2? What is your birth year ...


2

The adversary in this case decides to go for a hardware attack, specifically opening the computer/laptop case and removing the RAM to then dump the contents before searching for the password. So, the only way for this to work would be if the computer / laptop is turned on, and the drive / volume has been decrypted. If you are actually dealing with ...


2

All encryption methods have a secret key that needs to be stored somewhere. The quote doesn't say that he can't "disclose the method to access it", it only says that there is no password involved. That's a much weaker statement. This question basically comes down to whether there are encryption schemes that do not rely on a human brain for storing the ...


2

While there is much potential harm possible when you use your real name, one thing you should not neglect is others using your name. And while some sites offer means to remove content that seems or seeks to harm your reputation, many don't. So my take on this is, instead of (passively) fearing for your reputation, actively make sure it is a good one e.g. by ...


2

Single Sign On in a company means that you have one set of credentials for all the services the company uses That is not correct. Single signon means an employee only has to sign on once, with a single identity provider or authentication service. That signon creates an SSO session, along with a token or artifact. Other services and web sites can use the ...


2

There is a program written in Java called Anonymouth which assists with this: Anonymouth is a Java-based application that aims to give users to tools and knowledge needed to begin anonymizing documents they have written. It does this by firing up JStylo libraries (an author detection application also develped by PSAL) to detect stylometric patterns and ...


1

The risks of buying compromised hardware to spy on a common user is grossly overestimated. By several orders of magnitude. The absolute majority of security personal on all the world will die before being able to see such a thing on his hands. Way more people will die by lightning hit than those hit by Lightning-of-the-death cables. First: compromising ...


1

This looks like a question that would be asked by a Don! Always assume that the police could end up catching you. It may take them time, and they would need to be properly motivated. If that someone was just revealing the location where his little sister hides her candies, he probably wouldn't attract much attention. On the other hand, if he was leaking ...


1

Totally a real threat. Use a headset and cup your hand around the mike and your mouth, turn away from people - speak quietly. That is plenty good enough unless there is someone right next to you or someone with a sniper mike! The background noise of a public place makes it really hard to listen to something quietly spoken and nigh-on impossible to record ...


1

I wrote a partial solution to your need which I share. I only want to enable USB on exceptionnal occasion. I'm running a computer on which the use of an USB key can't be allowed. I wrote a shell script usb which is only switching on the required extensions to enable visibility of USB mass storage when I need it. Here is the man: Usage: usb [on|off|] To ...


1

If you're concerned about BadUSB and similar attacks, you'll just need to resort to checking all of your ports every time you come back after leaving your computer unattended. Do note, however, that even this doesn't protect you from BadUSB. BadUSB means I can take a normal piece of USB equipment, flash custom firmware on it, and wreak havoc with it. This ...


1

I guess you only want to use one USB port at a time (you could use a hub to this port in the few cases you need more ports) and you intend to keep this macbook until its out of service. (eg, it does not matter if some USB ports gets destroyed). Then I would suggest filling all USB ports except one with Expoxy glue. The port you select to be open would ...


1

It's generally bad practice to use your real details anywhere, unless compelled to do so by law or other very strong reason. Anything you ever disclose to any organization about your true identity can and will be used against you, sometimes in unexpected ways. Therefore you should always use a randomly generated pseudonym for every website/form/membership, ...


1

In general I would recommend against (except in the relatively rare set of circumstances in which you have no legal or practical means to avoid doing so), using your real name on-line. The reasons for this have been quite well-described above, but I would also add a couple of other ones : (1.) While -- today -- in the so-called "democratic" countries, we ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible