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Hi Mike Ounsworth here. This is a great excuse to do some back-of-the-envolope math! The factor to think about here is that when you're getting to numbers like 243, you have to start factoring in the number of hard drives, CPUs, and electricity required to store and use that data. To make math easy, let's say each of those 243 password is stored as a SHA1 ...


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A mixed-case alphanumeric password for lengths between 1 and 9 (inclusive) has a key space of 13,759,005,997,841,642, which is between 254 and 255. The math is a decent ballpark guess, but not a reasonable back-of-the-napkin guess. However, just because the math is wrong does not mean that conclusion is invalid. Humans are bad at passwords. We memorize ...


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This is not unusual for core passwords. Storing them in a digital password manager means that the password manager now has a password that needs to be protected. What do you do with that? Often through a paper process like you described. This type of paper process is normal. What is unusual is the number of systems involved. A paper process works for a ...


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The math may be right. Altough one could refine and complicate it as much as one would want, but it doesn't really add to the point. So I'll leave it be. Also, in pratice it is easier and might be faster to check for any random character password with a fixed length than to check unique passwords from a list. A password list with 2^43 passwords with an ...


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