22 votes

Can somebody explain simply why crypt of a password with a salt (the hash result) is equal to crypt of the password with the hash result itself?

The output of crypt looks like this: $1$L2l4$oqf.HIrymNg/YIIF.r.rP0 This is not just the cryptographic hash. The dollar signs in here split the structure into three strings: 1, the type of hash ...
Sjoerd's user avatar
  • 30.4k
17 votes

Can somebody explain simply why crypt of a password with a salt (the hash result) is equal to crypt of the password with the hash result itself?

In this case man 3 crypt is probably more useful than asking AI. AI has a tendency to be... not entirely correct. The man page has the following about return value: Upon successful completion, crypt, ...
vidarlo's user avatar
  • 16k
5 votes

Can somebody explain simply why crypt of a password with a salt (the hash result) is equal to crypt of the password with the hash result itself?

... it is not easy to extract the salt value from the hash The problem is that the term "hash" is overloaded with several different meanings and that you use the wrong meaning to interpret ...
Steffen Ullrich's user avatar
2 votes

Can somebody explain simply why crypt of a password with a salt (the hash result) is equal to crypt of the password with the hash result itself?

To expand on Sjoerd's answer: The original crypt(3) used DES, and used a very short 2-byte salt (it actually only used 12 bits of that), which was included as the first two bytes of the result, ...
jcaron's user avatar
  • 3,615
1 vote

How secure is Keychain on OS X?

The Keychain format is included in Apple's open source code, as part of darwin. The encryption within the Keychain format uses PBKDF2-SHA1 3DES, and is supported by hashcat. Given access to a Keychain ...
Graham Miln's user avatar

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