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Yes, ISO/IEC 27007 provides guidance on managing an information security management system (ISMS) audit program, on conducting audits, and on the competence of ISMS auditors, in addition to the guidance contained in ISO 19011:2011. ISO/IEC 27007 is applicable to those needing to understand or conduct internal or external audits of an ISMS or to manage an ...


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you can use the flag -PE, which performs a ICMP echo as an example: nmap -sn -n -PE 192.168.1.1-255 or for a cleaner result nmap -sn -n -PE 192.168.1.1-255 | grep report | cut -d" " -f5


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You can user ngrok to create tunnel through NAT https://ngrok.com/download 1. unzip /path/to/ngrok.zip 2../ngrok authtoken <YOUR_AUTH_TOKEN> You get authtoken when you create account on ngrok 3../ngrok http 80 this will create tunnel from your machine to access machine outside nat. someting like this Web Interface http://127.0.0....


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Because you're not saying anything about RelRO, I'm assuming no RelRO (so no leaking of the address of strcpy because it isn't called yet). Yet, this doesn't matter much, here's why: You say PIE is enabled, which in combination with ASLR will randomize the location of the binary in memory and thus the location of the PLT and GOT. Hence you cannot leak from ...


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It's completely normal that a site is only available with the domain, and it's vital for shared hosting: before the Host: header was added in HTTP 1.1 (RFC 2068, 14.23 from 1997, updated in RFC 7230, 5.4) every site required an own IP address, and before SNI (RFC 6066, 3) it was pretty much the same with HTTPS. This same Host: header could be used in your ...


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Penetration testing is done in multiple steps. From the information you have provided, you seem to have understood that the first step is information gathering. However, you violated a core principle of ethical penetration testing: Never attack a system you don't own or have permission to attack! Given that your teacher gave you two IP addresses to attack, ...


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Correction.. I’ll look again but in order to overwrite EIP you’d need to input a buffer that is buf +whateverIsAboveItOnStack + EBP (4bytes) + whateverYouWantEIPtoBe . Run the program in gdb and type disass strcpy() the you’ll be able to see where the overflow happens and where your buffers are located. Hope this helps. (gdb) run $(python -c 'print "a" *...


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