New answers tagged

1

Start by releasing him from those handcuffs. If the permission to attack slip did truly checkout, then John is not a criminal. He is simply a poor guy hired by your company trying to do his job, and has now found himself handcuffed to a chair. As such, I have my doubts he would try to run or attack anyone, so it should be safe to release him. As mentioned ...


0

Looking at the Kevo by Kwikset locks that you link to, the sophisticated attacks possible via bluetooth probably won't come into play - most of those locks appeared to have a standard key mechanism included. The problem with that is that I'm pretty sure Kwikset and their competition aren't putting in high-security cylinders - I'd bet they are the same ones ...


0

There is no widespread certification procedure for Bluetooth locks' digital security at the moment. This means using one is putting your security and privacy at the mercy of the lock's developer. As Bluetooth locks are an innovative product, they follow the usual innovation model: release new features to market ASAP, fix reported bugs later, and plan to ...


2

An obvious... no. You cannot break into private property and/or steal any form of belongings unless authorized to do so. Authorized, that is, by the owner(s) of the property. This includes non-invasive/non-damaging methods. Your local laws regarding the protection of property apply to the employees as much as to the stranger on the street. The company ...


38

It depends very much on the situation and your contract. Usually, reputable companies who conduct physical pentests have extensive guidelines for their pentesters in many situations. Such instructions are to be followed. I'm going to give a rough overview over possible ways such third-parties may be interacted with: Local Police Local Police is to be ...


Top 50 recent answers are included