Hot answers tagged

43

It depends. Could this number linked to a single person? (e.g. it is your cell number and if I know this number is in a database and know it's yours, then I know you are in that DB) Then yes. If this is not possible (e.g. it is the central call in number of a big corporation that is connected to any available agent) then no. If you only have phone numbers ...


22

The definition of personal data as mentioned in the GDPR: ‘personal data’ means any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person (‘data subject’); an identifiable natural person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to an identifier such as a name, an identification number, location data, ...


15

I don't use WA, so don't know specifically what practice the question refers to, but let's assume that the question refers to a practice where an app on a user's phone gets access to contacts and text history on the phone and uploads all phone numbers to the server without also uploading the names associated with those numbers (despite having access to them.)...


10

PII is anything that directly or indirectly can be associated to a person based on Regulation 2016/679 of the European Parliament. ‘personal data’ means any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person (‘data subject’); an identifiable natural person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference ...


8

Yes Clearly and fundamentally, without any doubt; and with especially strong implications when used in a Social Media context like WhatsApp. The issue is not whether WhatsApp links this phone number to some name when sending it to their server. The issue is that the information itself (the phone number) is linked to you, a person. PII is not so much about ...


8

TLDR: Possible From https://www.seobyrvc.com/what-is-personally-identifiable-information-pii/: The following are examples of “potentially personally-identifiable information”. That is, the data elements by themselves cannot be linked to a specific person but when combined with other information (such as items 1 through 11, above), they can be. A ...


4

Yes, it introduces risk, but might be required, depending on what you're doing with the data. Imagine a database of lots of people. Perhaps it includes names, addresses, and dates of birth, but the dates of birth aren't encrypted or tokenised, to allow for easy sending out birthday reminders. If an attacker who steals the database can identify the name ...


4

GDPR is more restrictive than the US definition of PII, in which, non-PII that allow any inference to the identities is also under GDPR jurisdiction. I doubt given masking examples will withstand GDPR audit. Replace the email address with an obvious placeholder (e.g. redacted@redacted.invalid), that is what everyone is doing. Partial masking is weak in ...


2

It makes no sense to keep information secret if they are trivially and cheaply obtainable by others anyway. For everything else somebody has to put some non-trivial effort and/or costs into collecting and associating such information. Due to this it will only be done if the expected return at least matches the efforts and costs needed to obtain such ...


2

Under GDPR or NIST definitions this would count as Personally Identifiable Information (PII). Anything that can be used to identify a person uniquely (by itself or in conjunction with other information) is considered PII.


2

AWS Privatelink isn't going to provide you anything special (or prevent anything you were already doing) in the way of encryption. It is a way to directly connect VPCs without having the traffic leave Amazon's network. This won't prevent you from using TLS since that is negotiated at the endpoints (your partner's server and your client for instance). The ...


2

There is no official guidance because this is not a GDPR enforced requirement. GDPR does not regulate specific security measures beyond making recommendations about what you should consider. Since you consider doing something like that, you in theory should do a Data Protection Impact Assessment to identify levels of risk may be associated with your ...


2

This is not just an issue with 3rd parties - banks have strict regulations about what PII they can use in development environments if controls are not up to the same strictness as production environment. The usual route is anonymisation or pseudo-anonymisation. From https://gdpr.report/news/2017/11/07/data-masking-anonymisation-pseudonymisation/: With ...


1

If there is unauthorised access to data due to the way the process is designed, then that, by definition is "data leakage". There might be no impact by having the data leaked, depending on the type of data, or the designers might have classified the access type as effectively "authorised" because they deem it "public data", but that's a separate issue and ...


1

SQLCipher is an option. You need to use threat modelling to really secure your service as there are many ways apart from classic hacking, such as outlined in OWASP Top 10. Particularly SQL injection or CSRF that could also compromise the PII. Encryption prevents someone from stealing the DBMS either logically or physically, it doesn't stop holes in your ...


1

According to the reference below (from the Department of the Navy CIO), badge numbers are "non-sensitive PII." On the other hand, things like: name, mother's maiden name, SSN, etc are "sensitive PII." Presumably, employee number would also be considered "non-sensitive PII." So, according to this reference, employee and badge numbers are "non-sensitive ...


1

Yes A base comparison I've been using is with a client's name, does a piece of information allow me to pick out an individual better or worse than a name? You may have hundreds of 'John Smith's but you'll only ever have one individual per phone number (or, at most, a family) and, therefore, it makes it a more identifying piece of information than the person'...


1

The majority of phone-numbers are linked to unique persons (e.g. their mobile, desk or home), making a phone-number a unique identifier number pointing to a single person. You could also argue that some phone-numbers are obviously not coupled to a person, but since the percentage of numbers that do largely outnumber the numbers that don't. (Since 2005 ...


1

This is asking a lot of questions... I'll try to suggest solutions where I can. Hacker subscribes users to sendgrid list unknowingly The generally-accepted solution to this problem is double opt-in. After the user submits their email, send them an email with a verification link. Your Captcha solution should help reduce validation link spam, but you ...


1

I have come across a couple of solutions that mostly fit this bill. Your list above is a good set of requirements for bookmark management. Implicitly, your points throw out Google's Chrome and Microsoft's browsers because those companies have shown intense hunger for personal data. Safari's benevolent tyranny is not very extensible, so that leaves you to ...


1

In the European Union you have the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) that will be enforced on May 25th, 2018 for all member states (that includes United Kingdom). Until now there has been a general framework that each member state would implement locally but that has led to different interpretations. This regulation will set the same terms for ...


1

Data masking is a common request and various vendors have their own solution or rely on 3rd party solutions. You could implement your own (for example using hashing) but as you pointed out, it would be difficult to maintain data integrity, constraints and formats. For example, you might have a national identity column which is validated using modulo X (or ...


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