Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Hot answers tagged

10

I'm figuring that the foundational knowledge about this topic is slowly being lost to time, and there are new course modules in schools around the world to cover this type of thing, so I think it's appropriate to cover it here. There is a separation between the content of a site and the advertisements shown on the site. Sites like Instagram (or newspapers, ...


7

HTML 5 local storage check allows you to reliably detect private browsing mode now (2019). It works by attempting to write then read "Local Storage". see: https://gist.github.com/jherax/a81c8c132d09cc354a0e2cb911841ff1 or https://github.com/jLynx/PrivateWindowCheck with PoC


4

I see there's a bounty because you want a more precise and up-to-date answer, but the truth is that the right answer was already given by others. I can just give you a few more details, even though I'm not a JS developer and I've never known how this stuff works either. The short answer is: they use JavaScript to implement some kind of heuristics that ...


3

Some Belkin routers set a default WPA password that could easily be derived from the router’s MAC address, and if you have one of those routers, then publishing your MAC address is an obvious security risk, because you’re effectively publishing your WPA password. Of course, the real risk is continuing to use the router without changing the default password, ...


2

Prelude The short version is the other accepted answers here are more or less correct, essentially you shouldn't assume your mac address is private, and posting it doesn't pose any direct risk to you as a person unless you're trying to remain anonymous. The long version: To really understand what risks leaking your MAC address poses requires two parts. ...


2

Another possible scenario is that a MITM replaces an image with one that exploits an RCE (remote code execution) vulnerability in the user's browser. Here's an example of such vulnerability: https://nvd.nist.gov/vuln/detail/CVE-2017-2416 --basically you can serve a crafted image containing executable code and have that code executed on older versions of ...


2

You are right that in order to mark a hash as belonging to a malicious URL, Google needs to have visited that URL in the past and have decided that it was malicious. It would be quite reasonable for them to keep the URLs they have labelled as malicious. Indeed if they have any sense, they will, because the more hashes they accumulate, the more URLs will ...


1

Now I’m wondering if the police is still able to trace my true location? It's clearly possible to track you down, even if you use a proxy which don't save any logs. There are various browser fingerprinting methods that can reveal your real location. Some of them are (mostly used together): Heigh and width of your browser window Canvas fingerprinting ...


1

DAB+ is a one-way signal transmission. A big, high-powered sender sends data encoded according to the standard, and the small, low-powered receiver receives the data, decodes it and plays the audio stream back. Does that mean my radio is 100% private? Most likely, yes. The DAB+ standard describes no signal sent from the radio and received by the base ...


1

... From there, it seems easy to keep a mapping between partial hashes and full URLs. Your argumentation is basically that it would technically be possible to reconstruct the URL from the hash if Google cared to store not only the hashes of malicious URL but also the associated URL. One can not deny that this is possible but in the same way it is possible ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible