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107

The short answer is that if the hardware is compromised, then anything you can read, it can read.


32

No, the device can see anything you can see, so if it's compromised, using encryption wouldn't protect you against that specifically. When you use encryption, it goes something like this: You type or say something into the phone. This goes through the phone's firmware / operating system to turn you touching the screen, pressing a button, etc. into some key ...


17

You have to put some level of trust somewhere in the chain. There's no direct way to find out where the backdoor could be. In android device, you may trust OS because of its kernel source but drivers and firmwares are proprietary. If these were flashed in compromised state, it gives an attacker same level of privilege as the kernel. If the OEM seems to be ...


14

If the phone is compromised it is possible for the attacker to hijack even encrypted communication, i.e. Telegram, Signal, WhatsApp, ... . This by itself has nothing to do with where the phone was produced, where it was sold and who is the manufacturer. And while it is not impossible that the vendor itself shipped their phones in a deliberately compromised ...


5

With POST the actual search is not part of the URL. It will thus not be visible in the Referer header to a potential remote side and it will also not be part of the local history. See also this comment in the Tor issuer tracker about the setup of DuckDuckGo in the Tor browser: You should probably do a POST request here as the value of the searchTerms ...


4

There are no explicit APIs to enumerate the browser extensions. But this does not mean they are not detectable or that they cannot be included in the fingerprint even if the specific extension is not detected. Browser extensions usually serve a purpose and this purpose can cause side effects, like manipulating the DOM (remove ads, change visual ...


3

With Ring 0 (kernel) malware anonymity can be preserved You just need to make sure you are under control of Ring -1 before you get infected by using a Type 1 hypervisor (one that runs underneath the operating system's kernel), and that the Virtual Machine that receives the attack is completely isolated from anything that can leak any identifying information. ...


3

I would agree with Izzy3110 to say the only way to be safe on unsafe hardware is to use your own code ('one-time pad' & 'under-the-rain' could help). That said, if the hardware is untrusted then you can't even type the message and encrypt it on the device, you have to type the already encrypted message (again see 'one-time pad'). Hardware is actually one ...


3

Essentially, the problem you are trying to solve is the same as DRM. It is practically impossible to securely store secrets client side (at least without specialized hardware), since the user has unlimited access to the client and can modify and inspect it at will. Include the private key with the jar file As you say, the user can easily reverse engineer ...


3

The sources you cite in your question suggest that you are confusing two different services offered by Cloudflare in the context of 1.1.1.1: there is the traditional offer, which consists only of a DNS server available directly or with DNS over HTTP (DoH) or DNS over TLS (DoT). and there is Cloudflare Warp, which is practically a VPN With Cloudflare Warp ...


2

No it is not secure. Most Sec agencies, have very strict "out-of-sight" policies for electronic items, to try and mitigate this issue. With no-question replacement/destruction if a device has been un-seen for more than a specified period of time. There is however another factor which is, you simply should not be using portable communications ...


2

It is impossible to say if a VPN provider and infrastructure is actually trustable for an unknown purpose (the only information about the purpose were "can I trust"). It is even impossible to evaluate the specific VPN if your purpose was actually more clear. Apart from developing a threat model for your purpose a proper evaluation would then likely ...


1

I have not seen the video but I believe you are mistaken/ misunderstanding something. Those services use a Selective Forwarding Unit (SFU). The turn server is only used for traversing double nat-ed connections. The SFU combines the incoming streams and re-encrypts them for transport (this is not E2E but is Encrypted at transit) The turn servers just pass ...


1

Placing your trust in any individual third party is inherently bad. The VPN provider (in this case Opera) will have all your traffic, and there is no way to know what they do with it. So the question of trust becomes "Do you trust this third party that they won't misuse your data, taking into account that there is probably no way for you to find out if ...


1

Why is it so crucially important to a lot of people to have "occasional convenience" ... There is no 100% security. Security has its costs, which is not only the costs of buying some products but also to invest the time to secure everything, to make sure that no strange interactions happen, to gain the knowledge to do all of this etc. On top of ...


1

If you use 1.1.1.1 with DNS over TLS or DNS over HTTPS, and you use it properly by preventing normal plaintext DNS traffic with a firewall, then it will hide DNS queries from your landlord. What does this mean? Your landlord will still see the IP of the server your browser is talking to. He will not be able to see the URL. However, and this is a big however, ...


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