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5

I have an Android APP with millions of users, but some users are malicious users (robot, fake, etc) ... I want to find a way to uniquely identify each mobile phone device, in order to blacklist malicious mobile phone (hardware). While your underlying problem is not really known (see XY problem) I think your approach to solve it is wrong in the first place. ...


5

While the communication between your browser and Twitter is encrypted with HTTPS and also additionally in case of Shadowsocks, the messages you publish can be seen by others - that's the point of Twitter. Depending on the content and time of these messages it might be possible to narrow down who might have send these messages. And the more messages you post ...


4

I don't think that the development itself is so much of a problem if done alone, offline and with proper disc encryption and if the software never gets distributed. But, if you need help in development you need to communicate with others or at least get information from the internet. It might for example be that the developer forums you visit are ...


4

Steffen's answer is about how the activity of posting on twitter could be detected. Mine is how to change hints that something is suspect into evidences that a specific human being has posted messages. Once an governmental agency thinks you could be suspected to illegaly (in their sense) use internet, the can revert to the good old methods. That means that ...


3

As someone who has monitored network traffic in a company: yes, it will be generating traffic even in the background. I've been alerted to porn and investigated. I set up operations to watch employees on their laptops to see if they are actively browsing porn at work, and they weren't, but it was in a background window. Whether the traffic can be traced ...


2

You cannot hide from the client any information the client will need. Even with cryptography. Let's think about it: you have some tokens, and the client script will need the tokens in clear text. To stop someone to read the tokens, you encrypt them. Now nobody, not even the client script, can read it. You need the client to read the tokens, so you send ...


2

No. If you fetch such information for the user dynamically, there is no way to hide it from the browser. In the end, the user will have to decrypt the encrypted roles. A bad actor will simply check the JS responsible for this part and log the information as it's being decrypted. You cannot stop this without changing your architecture.


2

The problem with SQL injection is not how the data are stored in the database but that statements in the query language are code and data combined into a string these statements are often constructed by manually combining strings of code with strings of untrusted data improper validation of the untrusted data leads to interpretation of these data as code, ...


1

There will always be a way to spoof the data even if you could use imei.. it can be spoofed... I usually use a unique ID, UsrName, MAC, IP, operating system, screen size and a long 'transaction token' (this token changes over time, in each login and when other values change it gets reset every login also) this is used to verify the users identity and as an ...


1

Yeah, modern websites with javascript running in the browser may "phone home" to keep their session alive, or to update page content, ads, etc. So yeah, it's possible, and maybe even likely, that it would have generated some network traffic. That said, unless the porn is illegal, the IT people probably don't care.


1

Assuming all of your provider's allocated addresses are within a certain geographical area, you cannot obtain another address unless you tunnel or proxy in some way.


1

If you are using the company WiFi on your own devices and the employer has no direct control over these devices (i.e. no special software installed, not company managed) then your employer can not directly access your browsing history. But it might be possible to infer some information from what your phone or laptop currently does. For example you might ...


1

In your use-case, there are many missing variables such as: what are they enforcing today? if your machine is domain-joined, are you able to work remotely and whether that is permitted by the company. But in any case allow me to try and explain their side of things and than summarize the impact it may have on you: Why they have requested you to install a ...


1

It really depends on how the advertising server are serving the adverts - it could be based on IP tracking, in which case the only way to avoid it would be to use a separate connection, in this case meaning a VPN, Tor, a mobile hotspot etc. If other devices are using the same account, such as the same Google, Facebook, or Microsoft account, then that would ...


1

No! Service Workers also run in origin context, just as normal JavaScript. So, for a Service Worker registered for a domain cannot really interact with Service Worker registered for another domain. Furthermore, they do not have access to the DOM, unlike JavaScript. And, as long as you visit a site, it doesn’t need SW to track your activities within that ...


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