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As a starting point, we will consider that each elementary operation implies a minimal expense of energy; Landauer's principle sets that limit at 0.0178 eV, which is 2.85×10-21 J. On the other hand, the total mass of the Solar system, if converted in its entirety to energy, would yield about 1.8×1047 J (actually that's what you would get from the mass of the ...


31

Stack Exchange has multiple layers of security preventing this. Captchas and email addresses are required. The email check is easy to beat with a script, but the captchas aren't; you'd need a Captcha breaking service to even get this off the ground. None of your bots can vote at the start, so you can't accumulate rep just by posting questions; human eyes ...


30

Note: the actual simple operations used are not relevant here - they might be operations on a quantum computer, or hash invocations, or whatever. Well, a quantum computer is the reason no one can tell you the "amount of simple operations that can be obviously seen as out of reach for all humanity for the forseeable future". By definition a quantum computer ...


18

This is a bit old (2006), but may be helpful towards your goal. http://usabilitynews.org/password-security-what-users-know-and-what-they-actually-do/ It is based on a study of 328 undergraduate and graduate level college students from Wichita State University volunteered to participate in the survey, and these students were also regular users of the ...


13

#infosec and #security are the two main hashtags I'm aware of. Depending on what you're interested in there are other less popular hashtags. For example: #websecurity #privacy #cybercrime #cyberwar #hacker and #hackers #cybersecurity #malware #spam There's also the option to use multiple hashtags in your search. If, for example, you are interested in ...


12

The basic path for exploiting an overflow-related vulnerability is to find a crash (often by fuzzing), evaluate the crash and whether it presents an attack path, and then build something to exploit it. Sometimes where one looks can involve knowledge of the architecture, such as when Charlie Miller noted that iOS 4.3 has a section of memory which will run ...


11

C6C server are often servers that got hacked, not servers rented by the attacker. Security support contracts For public organisations there are often CERTs (computer emergency response team) responsible for them. For example there is the DFN Cert for all Germany universities. Large companies tend to have support contracts with companies specialized in ...


11

Here are several steps you could take to encourage security researchers to disclose vulnerabilities to you: Waive liability. Promise not to sue researchers who disclose vulnerabilities to you in a responsible fashion. Currently, many researchers report worrying that reporting a vulnerability to a company could get them sued, and so sometimes they just don'...


9

To look at your assumptions: many attack groups have resources vastly bigger than that of companies in a typical company security is a cost centre, so they never have enough staff or money in the black hat world, finding security flaws is a revenue stream fuzzing is done by security engineers and black hats fuzzing is by its very nature fallible. So many ...


9

If these bots are capable of crafting original, on topic, quality question/answers such that moderators/users don't catch them, I welcome them to the community.


8

Covert channels and side channels are hard to eliminate. Additionally, many of the open problems in computer science have implications for security. There is a need for formal ways to specify software, and there is a need for formal ways to specify security requirements. The difficulty we have proving program correctness for critical programs the size of ...


7

A recent thing to add here which probably is relevant to the question is that Landauer's Principle might not actually hold up: http://phys.org/news/2016-07-refutes-famous-physical.html They measured the amount of energy dissipated during the operation of an "OR" gate (that is clearly a logically irreversible gate) and showed that the logic operation ...


7

Smart phones are not that different from laptops, so building your own mobile lab and attacking the targets there is a good approach. Hosting your target: Use an Android emulator to host your Android target. You can interact with it from the command-line via ADB iOS has the same thing but they call it the iOS Simulator Or you can use physical phones but ...


6

I don't know how "state-of-the-art" this is, but the password recovery software Passcape uses a dictionary attack against passphrases. This is very similar to a simple brute force character-permutation attack against a password, except permutations of dictionary words are used instead (once common phrases and quotes from movies, books, and poems are ...


6

There is no opposition between "linear algebra" and "discrete math". For instance, a Linear Feedback Shift Register is "linear" in the sense of linear algebra, but also totally discrete. What is seldom encountered in computers is not the "linear" part, but the use of real or complex numbers as base field -- because computers are not good at storing numbers ...


6

Likely helpful: Verizon's Data Breach Investigations Reports Trustwave's Global Security Reports Mandiant's M-Trends


5

The closest thing I've seen to what you're asking (and it has nothing to do with state-sponsorship) is this speech by Ken Thompson during his Turing Award Lecture. It basically asks the question, if the gcc compiler was at one point poisoned to produce compilers which produced backdoor-ed code, and then the was used to compile gcc for a number of major ...


5

Buffer overflows might be specific to a given target architecture; on PC and PC-like machines, it is possible that a buffer overflow exists in 32-bit mode and not in 64-bit mode, and vice versa. A buffer overflow is a programming bug: the program tries to do something that is not possible (writing more data than possibly fits in a buffer), and certainly not ...


5

To add to some other answers as people have mentioned there's a lot of different areas to security and they're not all suited to book-based learning. That said you could look at Security Engineering by Ross Anderson. This is what popped into my head first when you said you're looking for a security equivalent to SICP. It's somewhat academic in tone, but ...


5

I recommend Bruce Schneiers Secrets and Lies, which I read recently. It's a good introduction, but not the same way SICP is an introduction to programming. It does a good job with teaching mentality though.


5

Now that we've all agreed we're all speculating... There has been a small but significant trend in which whitehat intrusion into or onto clearly malicious infrastructure has been treated as permissible, necessarily expedient, or - uh - "look-the-other-way-able". We saw it several months ago when the US government took control of various domain names. I am ...


5

Although I very much like @thomas-pornin's answer, I think there's a problem with the first assumption that must be called out. Laundauer's Principle only applies to irreversible operations. Contrary to what some may assume, reversible computing is already achievable. The operations are common in quantum computers and homomorphic encryption systems. ...


5

You should keep in mind sites like Google, Yahoo, Amazon have a couple (of thousand) of servers. They can afford to "open the doors" to everybody because, as M15K pointed, their resources are not limited. There are a couple of reasons they might do be "open": 1. You can gather performance statistics. 2. You can test the system for stability (if server X ...


5

Yes, not only is linear algebra required in many computer science programs it also has security implications. Linear Algebra can be used to detect doctored photographs. Vector Clocks are important in distributed systems and time can play a role in security. Linear algebra is also used in GPS and Missie Guidance. GPS Spoofing requires Linear Algebra ...


5

Well there's a couple of aspects to consider here, as has been said there is no clear answer. On the one hand you've correctly identified the risks of public disclosure with no easy remediation, which is that attackers can take advantage of the issue. However there are also risks with not publicly releasing. For example, it's entirely possible that other ...


5

For hiding the data, you use encryption. For making sure it came from a known source, i.e. authentication use a message authentication code (MAC), or authenticated encryption. Note that confidentiality (making sure only the intended recipient can read the message) and authenticity (making sure the message came from a known source) are different! For ...


4

I believe a big problem currently is password reuse. XKCD #792 illustrates the problem with a "bit" of humour.


4

The official statement says, "McAfee has gained access to one specific Command & Control server used by the intruders." It would seem extremely likely that they were brought into the picture for analysis by someone with access to the C&C server considering the implications the alternative (McAfee turning black hat) would have to their company. If ...


4

You have previously asked for some documents regarding using Markov Chains to perform bruteforce attacks, and I'm still assuming you are looking for techniques to find the low hanging fruits. There is no obstacles to perform a bruteforce attack using markov chains against passphrases. You just use words instead of characters as states, in what you could ...


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