9

Several motherboards have overheating protection, if the computer or especially the CPU / graphics card gets too hot, the computer will switch off. So ... turn up the heat in the room (with a big heat-source) until the computer starts rebooting indefinetly. It will be hard not to damage other components I think. In order not to target other nearby ...


6

There's a number of possible aspects at play here. First up as @gegenbeispiel says it could just be a bluff, however lets consider the possibilities if it's not. Unencrypted wireless. Obvioulsy if people have unenecrypted wireless it would be technically possible to sniff traffic going over the network and determine whether iPlayer URLs were accessed and ...


5

I think this tweet from BBC settles the question: and I quote: "While we don't discuss the details of how detection works for obvious reasons, it is wrong to suggest that our technology involves capturing data from private wi-fi networks." Via: http://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2016/08/no-bbc-probably-can-not-snoop-wifi-via-tv-detector-vans.html


4

It's very hard, but you can identify some sources. You can scan for the common types (GSM, Wifi, etc), but there's no way to tell a encrypted low-bandwidth signal from noise. Even if you get a very wide band scanner (from kHz to GHz), it's almost impossible to identify every channel entering a building. Signals exiting a building can be easier. You will ...


3

It's a bluff, like so much of BBC/Capita licencing stuff. Easily defeated by using RJ45 and either turning WiFi off or putting the router into a metal Faraday cage. Aluminium foil would suffice. It would be very difficult to provide criminal-conviction-standard proof with data like this. Unless BBC puts iplayer behind a paywall, any prosecution is going to ...


3

There are hardware devices available that will detect a 3G signal. Pulling the MAC address or such involves intercepting the traffic, which has legal implications, so consult a lawyer, and be prepared for them to yell at you for even thinking of intercepting phone calls without a warrant. There are also devices that can jam a 3G signal. Again, there may be ...


3

I don't know of any attacks on Ethernet or USB, but here are two related topics that might interest you. Fault attacks. A fault attack involves injecting some sort of error or faulty data into a computation. It is sort of the dual of a side-channel attack. Some research papers you might enjoy: Optical Fault Induction Attacks, CHES 2002. Tamper Resistance ...


3

For wireless attacks, you're limited by having to induce currents in the machine, and it's nigh impossible to do that predictably, without going overboard (i.e. EMP style) and causing permanent damage. You could try doing something the (maybe) installed wireless card, but you'd have to know something of the software, and you'd basically be attacking using ...


3

It sounds like you're trying to cause/prevent a resettable denial of service condition. If you are ruling out network access to attack the software running on the system, you might consider interfering with the data going through the various devices on the mother board. I'm not an RF engineer or an EE (Electrical Engineer), but it seems though it might be ...


2

Electromagnetic radiation? Many parts of computers (such as Hard Disks) rely on magnets. Provide a sufficient amount of electromagnetic radiation, and the computer is bound to stop working. If the exposure to these waves isn't for too long, there (probably) wouldn't be any permanent damage, the computer would just crash as soon as the hard disk started ...


2

Well, when talking about the internals of a computer, Any access point you can access physically without pulling hardware out, so basically anything you can attach a probe-lead to without causing a short. So what can what is not accessible. CPU, this is often only available for sniffing from when using specialized equipment in between the CPU and the main-...


2

How this could work: BBC iPlayer is obviously under control of the BBC. When it streams video, it can freely determine the packet sizes used, and create a pattern in those packet sizes. Even if you use VPN, the VPN server would encrypt the packets, and the packet sizes would be a bit bigger, but still in a recognisable pattern. So it may be possible to look ...


1

What are you describing is an EMP emitter. If the EMP emitter is not strong enough it will not destroy the device, it will only cause an interruption. The EMP pulse power depends on the number of wire wraps, wire thickness and voltage so the EMP power can range. Best way to protect against it is by creating a Faraday cage, this will not provide a full ...


1

I'm not aware of such attacks. It may be significantly harder than attacking telephone wires due to the high frequencies used in todays USB/Ethernet. I also imagine it would be of questionable merit. If you want to inject data, you can use Wifi, physically tap into cables or attach to Thunderbolt/Firewire ports and perform DMA transfers. Don't see much ...


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