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... company with sensitive customer relations Given that many common mail clients support at least S/MIME by default, it actually makes sense to use it. This means that mails should at least be signed by S/MIME. Signing does not cause any problems when mail clients do not support it, but provides solid sender authentication for S/MIME capable clients and ...


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Well all of these crypto have a different purpose and nice problem they solve: TLS, protect the communication between server and client. (And server to server). If a public CA is used than this can also be used to authenticate where a message came from (server 2 server that is) S/MIME, is a encapsulation crypto around a specific message. It only works ...


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You can't generate a CSR using only a publickey, you need the privatekey, which for historical reasons PGP calls the 'secret' key. Also once you get a cert, to do anything useful with it you need the privatekey. (Both PGP and OpenSSL-compatible privatekey file formats include the publickey, so you don't need that separately, although depending on the ...


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So, I'll admit, OpenPGP is not something I have much more than a superficial knowledge of. I always end up back in the docs when I have to explain something - it's just not a useful technology for most of what I do (web app development in the cloud). Go/No-Go Decision Mileage will vary, somewhat, depending on your key type. The CA will have a specific set ...


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The client usually supports more ciphers than it announces because there is a difference between both. One thing is the capabilities - maybe a better name would be preferences - being a list of those ciphers that the clients wants the other client to use when sending messages. The other thing is the list of actually supported ciphers, which is usually longer ...


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