101

Ars Technica did a superb piece on this a couple of years ago. A woman who is a real estate agent and publishes her cell phone, was inundated with junk calls. What was odd about these was They were fully automated calls They never played a message They used a different number every time They detailed her nightmare On the first night, France went to bed, ...


82

You can change your IP to whatever you want; that's trivial. But that will not work the way you want to. Let's say the store's ISP is Apple Networks, and their IP range is 1.2.3.0 to 1.2.3.255. You note that and get home. Your home network is from Avocado Networks, and their IP range is 2.3.4.5. You change your IP to 1.2.3.123 and wait. Nothing happens. You ...


49

Offensive defense is the type of attack you are looking to perform. You have been the victim of a technological crime, you are the target of a phishing campaign, and you want to get even. This is a very normal response and I can tell you that many organizations, governments, and individuals attempt this on their own daily. There is a major issue with any ...


30

Security of the PSTN is horrifically poor. It's very easy to spoof anyone's number on Caller ID, without having to hack into any of their systems. As such, Caller ID provides no real assurance of who actually called you. There are even services available that the general public can use (for a small fee) to spoof any number they want.


28

The CallerID displayed on the phone was never designed to be secure. Most VoIP (telephone over the internet) providers will allow the end user to set the outgoing number to be whatever they want. There's good reasons for this, one of which is your incoming provider doesn't have to be (and often isn't) your outgoing provider. This is commonly seen in spam ...


28

I've just checked on Whois.us. Both domains are registered to the same person, with a stated address in London. Try talking to the internet fraud team from your local police. Chances are they're overworked, but if they've got some free time then they may be able to go to TLDsolutions.com and trace the payments. For most countries this would be a dead loss, ...


17

Having an SPF record in your DNS records helps the recipient know which email server is legtimiate for your domain. The recipient looks up the sending domain for the valid server IPs and then decides what to do with the email. If the sending IP is on the list, then the email is likely OK. If the sending IP is not on the list, then it should be treated ...


17

From my understanding the message originally tried to fool the user into clicking some seemingly expected link (as shown in the text) which in reality is a different link (href attribute in the actual link), i.e. something like <a href=http://attacker> http://example.com </a> This trick was successfully neutralized by some secure mail gateway ...


16

Call the police and sue them in court! That will show them you can be mean. Moreover, it will be legal and you will stay out of trouble.


14

The attackers are skilled enough to not enable the phone and to set up a fake Find My iPhone site. This clearly shows they understand fairly well how the iPhones security features work and are trying to trick you into revealing the credentials that will let them get around those. Unless you are highly skilled yourself, they probably have the upper hand in ...


13

You can spoof your IP to whatever you want it to be. Pick a number, any number! However, you can't use it to trick a HTTP server into believing your are someone you are not. The TCP handshake protects against IP spoofing. So no luck there. Anyways, my guess is that the webpage that is shown on the devices isn't discriminating based on IP. Sounds more ...


8

Practically yes, you can spoof it but it won't help in too many situations. The IP protocol specifies that each IP packet must have a header which contains the IP address of the source of the packet. The source IP address is normally the address that the packet was sent from, but the sender's address in the header can be altered so that to the recipient it ...


7

Just having a SPF record does not mean that nobody is able to use your email address as the claimed recipient for spoofed messages. First, SPF only cares about the SMTP envelope and not about the From field in the mail header. It is no problem to send a mail where both are different. There are no information in your question of what the SMTP envelope was (...


6

I first saw the original referenced question and answered there, but I'll copy/paste my answer here since and add some more details to your additional questions: ISP's should implement anti-spoofing. IETF's BCP38 (written in 2000!) describes a best practice for networks to do network filtering filtering to reduce spoofing and thus prevent DDoS atacks, but ...


6

Ultimately, the answer is that there is no way of preventing jamming and fine spoofing in GPS or a GPS-like system due to the inherent principles of which it operates. RF systems are always subject to jamming. You can make it more difficult, as modernized GPS does with error correction, higher powers, and multiple frequencies. But you can always overwhelm a ...


5

It's called phishing, and no, 2FA doesn't prevent it in most cases (but you should still use 2FA). This sort of attack is why people recommend to always look at the browser's address bar before typing in a password (though that's had its own issues). When logging in through a local application though, you just have to trust that application to not steal your ...


4

To echo James' response. It is entirely possible for someone to send you something for a number that doesn't belong to them. This will usually be criminals trying to get you to click a link and steal credentials. Whether this is likely will be dependant on the nature of the message received. If the message is generic and contains a link then sure it's a ...


4

If you still have service to your phone, it's unlikely to be a SIM swap attack. Generally, one of the consequences of a SIM swap is that all the services provisioned on your phone (including your phone number) are transferred to the attacker's phone, by the exact same process as those services would be transferred to your new phone when you upgrade. This is ...


3

Your fake certificate need to be signed by a Root Certificate. Root certificates are owned by Certificate Authorities. Certificate authorities are trusted by operating systems and browsers and their certificates are implanted in our devices. If your fake certificate can't be verified by any of these authorities certificates then you cannot have that little ...


3

A screenshot doesn't prove anything. At all. As long as you know how to use Paint you can modify anything you want. So the screenshot could be fake. Or he could indeed have sent that message and then deleted it. Conclusion: you can't know based on just the information you currently have. You'll have to find more information: If it was an actual text ...


2

Sadly, there isn't really a way to prevent it. It's an inherent weakness of the SS7 system. However, you can try to educate your users to not fall for these scams. Maybe you can even hack back and try to play their game and trick them.


2

CarbonCopy creates a self-signed certificates which looks like the original certificate, i.e. subject, issuer etc seem to match. But, the certificate is not signed by the specified issuer at all. This means if a proper validation of the certificate is done no local trust anchor will be found and the certificate will be rejected as untrusted.


2

This message is coming from an 'abundance of caution' so that you understand that you may be engaging in something that may be dangerous (organized / violent criminals). The other postings indicate that the messages are from reasonably sophisticated thieves that are fishing for your info. Escalating ("being mean") is potentially dangerous unless you are ...


2

Contact your mobile network The best solution is to contact your mobile network. They can track the sender and help you. I sometimes receive sms from unknown numbers asking me to send money on another unknown number. This sounds like a scam and your mobile network operator or carrier can block the senders for you if requested.


2

Actually, there's not that much of a difference. The same techniques available for IPv4 can be applied for IPv6. Reverse path filtering (RPF) and static access-lists are the most common used, but given a specific network and its design other techniques can be used. MANRS has a nice overview on anti spoofing techniques for both IPv4 and IPv6: https://www....


2

Actually the SPF record only tells which server(s) legitimate mails using your domain may come from - and we're talking envelope information (SMTP/RFC2821) here, not the From line inside the mails (RFC2822). Inside your mail program you'll normally only see the mail content (RFC2822), so a mail using your domain in the From line may actually have been sent ...


2

The title says it all really. Say my IP address was 1.2.3.4 and I wanted to change or 'spoof' it so that its exactly 2.3.4.5, would this be possible or are there too many varying factors that need to be taken into account before getting a definitive answer YES AND NO. Firstly there are two ip addresses Private ip. Public ip. Your private ip could ...


2

As others have said, Yes, you can declare your IP address to be anything you like, But No, the rest of the internet will not talk to you. This would essentially be akin to replacing the numbers on your house from "123 Real Avenue" to "321 Fake Street" - the mailman isn't going to start delivering you someone else's mail, because regardless of what it says ...


2

Maybe... just maybe.. a simple answer is that your friend has a malware on his phone, and the "victim" isn't actually you but him. I'd suggest you let him know he should comb through his installed apps/plugins, ask if he's installed anything sketchy lately, especially if it reoccurs.


1

The simile I generally use for less technical people is that the caller ID is like the return address on a envelope sent through the post, and you shouldn't trust it any more than you trust that. Most people don't fake it because they're interested in getting back, but anybody can write anything they want in that spot. (I provide no technical explanation ...


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