157

It looks like the main site is embedding script from Adobe Marketing Cloud directly into the page. While these scripts are loaded from the same server as the main site it looks like that these scripts communicate with external servers using XHR and also download new script from demdex.net and 2o7.net according to the logs of uBlock Origin. Especially the ...


85

There is a chance that once the bitcoins have been converted into ‘real money’ or ‘real assets’ the ledger could leak information on the owners of those bit coins. But even then tracking and attribution can be very complex, but in answer to your question the reason in this case is probably that the attacker(s) haven’t ‘cashed’ them in yet. Depending on who ...


61

The problem with this scenario is that emails are typically not sent from the device itself, but from a central service. In order to do what you want, the investigators would have to make a few hops: to the email service (gets the user account details, including the IP the user used to connect with) to the ISP the device used at the time of sending (gets ...


46

If the police have an email, sent by a suspect over a 3G or 4G network, could they use the IP address (since they know when it was sent) to find out - from the service provider - the precise location the email was sent from? Yes, this is very easy. However... the key word here is "precise location." Not exactly. Not unless the phone is hacked. Government ...


31

If you're concerned about trackers, you're probably looking for First Party Isolation. First Party Isolation is a feature that Firefox adopted from the Tor browser's Cross-Origin Identifier Unlinkability concept. FPI works by linking all cookies to the first-party domain (the one in the URL bar), making third-party cookies distinct between different domains....


25

The device name is constructed as follows on first use: // setup our unique device name if (TextUtils.isEmpty(SystemProperties.get("net.hostname"))) { String id = Settings.Secure.getString(context.getContentResolver(), Settings.Secure.ANDROID_ID); if (id != null && id.length() > 0) { String name ...


24

There's another common way that email leaks location information. If the email includes a photograph that was taken on a smartphone, the photo will usually have location information embedded. Since you're writing the story, you might contrive to have the sender email a photo for some reason. The JPEG standard (used for virtually all mobile phone photos) ...


19

In addition to what @schroeder wrote, I would like to point out a few things about geolocation. Among other things, a CDR (Call Detail Record) contains information about the cell tower used by the mobile phone at the time. Note that a cell tower can cover an area of about one square mile, or more. In some countries, mobile operators might always be able to ...


18

For the same reason for which other kinds of hackers aren't arrested. They may be trackable by the transactions. Unless they have a good system of money laundering. In addition there's usually the problem with international jurisdiction, etc, etc. The bitcoin transactions may be run via hacked accounts and/or may be run over multiple accounts that are ...


17

Bitcoins carry with them a complete log of their entire transaction history. So the bitcoins used to pay that ransom can forever be found. Whomever has them in their possession can be tracked down, at least elecronically. Transfering those bitcoins into other currency or goods could be used to track down the person who benefited from the bitcoin. To ...


16

Banking sites are hardly monolithic. A bank usually relies on dozens or even hundreds of third party systems in their overall solution. You might have a banking host provided by one vendor, a credit card solution from two or three more vendors, a signon solution provided by yet another, payments by another. The work to put together these sites is enormous. ...


13

The pirate bay used multiple proxies around the world. As soon as one got detected, they switched over to another one. They used preinstalled encrypted images that they deployed at numerous cloud providers around the world. In order to stay hidden, the servers used many different techniques. All traffic between the proxies and the main servers was tunneled ...


11

Earlier answers already describe the process of using triangulation to pinpoint the location of a specific phone better than I could describe it. However there is very little said about whether the investigators can figure out which exact phone the mail was sent from. In traditional mail services where the user run an email client on their device and use ...


11

To understand the differences, we have to look at the different goals of the two. Or in other words: What do they want to do? What do they do? And how does it affect you as an end user? In this answer I will speak of Firefox's Multi Account Containers and Firefox's Facebook Container as pretty much the same thing, because - as far as I understand it - ...


9

The biggest issue surrounding "cyber" related crimes is that of attribution. The second biggest issues lies in collaboration by law enforcement agencies around the world. Let's look at the first issue, attribution: "Where did it come from/who did it." Many attacks are often chained via multiple connections until the attacker ends up at a destination. E.g.: ...


8

Speaking as a wireless telecom professional, the answer to your question depends on how precise you expect the location to be. With minimal effort (and a legal obligation to do so), I can tell exactly which cellsite(s) you were using, which narrows your location down to a particular geographic area. And we don't even need to know the IP Address, we just ...


7

There's no difference: DuckDuckGo doesn't offer any privacy protection when redirecting the search to another result page with a !bang. E.g. !google foo (https://duckduckgo.com/?q=!google+foo) just redirects to https://google.com/search?hl=en&q=foo using both meta refresh <meta http-equiv='refresh' content='0; url=https://google.com/search?hl=en&...


6

There is some Android ransomware that is fairly easy to get rid of using Android Debug Bridge. These are older lock screen trojans. Here's a page that has a good breakdown of the types and how to get rid of them. Some newer Android ransomware is very effective, but if you get one of these, you really have only 2 options - wipe the device or pay the ransom. ...


6

This feature randomly changes the MAC address reported by the phone. Nothing else. The MAC address is available to the Wi-Fi network but also, potentially, to software running on the device. E.g. a browser. MAC addresses are actually in two parts. The first part tells you what manufacturer the device (strictly speaking the manufacturer of the network ...


6

Bitcoin can combine several transactions' outputs as a new transaction's input, and it can also split a single transaction's output among many recipients. This is because only balances are transferred in transactions, not individual units of bitcoin. "Mixing" services do this to obscure where bitcoin is going. After inspecting one of these transactions, ...


6

Fire up an incognito browser window (or VM instance if you are really paranoid) to view WaPo, then only use it for that site, or close it and open a new one each time you visit.


6

You, as an individual, can't find who's behind an IP address. Well, you can grab an IP address via social-engineering tricks if you suspect someone, but if you have no idea who to suspect, then you're basically out of options here. The FBI is a government agency, they can just ask your Internet Service Provider because the law may allow them to do so ...


5

This can be done (see other answers) but the better question is-- even if you spent $1000 on all-new networking equipment, routers, wifi pineapples and whatnot, and you successfully captured the burglar's phone's hardware MAC address, the better questions are: How does this prove that the actual owner of the phone was in your house (and the phone itself ...


5

By claiming that it should be possible to find the original hacker simply by tracing back all connections this question implicitly assumes multiple things which are not true: All countries would need to work together to find the attacker because otherwise the attacker could just hide their path by connecting through several countries. But, this would mean ...


4

Note: this question might have been better on the Tor community despite being on-topic here. Thomas Roth demonstrated that Protonmail was vulnerable to a Cross-site scripting (XSS) attack. The video (Vimeo) he made shows that at least the mail body was vulnerable to Javascript injection. As soon as the receiver read the mail, the code is executed. ...


4

The SMB protocol (also CIFS) is meant to share files over the local networks. Since the file is hosted on your computer, there has to be a way to get your address for the client to retrieve it. Therefore, for the service to work, the file has to be able to be traced to your computer.


4

Warning: This answer is pure speculation. It is also hard to get references for covert programs, but I've linked to Wikipedia pages which have some good references. I've also stayed away from examining WhatsApp's implementation, as there are several other Security SE posts discussing various aspects of it. I hope I have matched your scenario correctly in ...


4

You're talking about a photo's EXIF data. It's metadata embedded into photographs by the device taking the pictures. Often it includes: Device information (model, sometimes serial number) Photograph information (Resolution, aperture, focal length, size, etc) GPS Information (Lat, Long) There are tools out there to strip EXIF data from pictures if you're ...


4

"Spoof" may be a poor term that will lead you down unhelpful paths. You want to obfuscate your location. Dynamic DNS or pivoting off of another server that you have cracked are ways to put layers in between yourself and the target and not expose yourself directly. So, the victim connects to a static address (Dyn DNS or static IP of another hacked server), ...


4

It depends on the method you are being tracked. If we are talking about a "wiretap," then the tracking is being done at the telco and as long as you maintain the same phone number, regardless of SIM or phone, it will get captured. If we are talking about false mobile towers, like Stingray devices, then you are being tracked by multiple factors; SIM, phone ...


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