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This comment seems to talk about an old VeriSign extension called CZAG. It appeared to have been relatively common a dozen years ago, but I am not sure it is still used. Indeed, it seems that the encryption system was extremely sloppy; this article (published at Usenix in 2002) describes the extension, what it contains, and what it leaks through really poor ...


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U-Prove is a technology which is, roughly, a mix of digital certificates and blind signatures. The Prover has a few "attributes" that the Issuer (i.e. the Certification Authority, more or less) asserts to be true. However, when dealing with any given Verifier, the Prover wants to be able to choose what he shows: namely, he wants to show only some of the ...


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To put things simply, one of the goals of U-Prove is to provide some kind of anonymity (in their words, "preventing unwanted user tracking"). This makes revocation harder. In an X.509 context, where there is no user anonymity (a certificate contains the owner's name in plain words), revocation is simple: the authority who decides who is revoked and who is ...


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Theoretically, on a Windows system, the Certificate Propagation Service automatically extracts all the certificates from any smart card which is inserted, and copies them into the "My" store of the current user. Each such certificate is registered with a link back to the corresponding private key, which is in the smart card. When the smart card is to be used,...


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I try to answer your question (hope I understood it correctly, if not please let me know). I did not find the comment in the given link. First of all in U-Prove you are able to use a blinded gamma (I guess that's what you ment). The blinded gamma comes from the Attribute Authority (AA). With this blinded gamma the Issuer is not able to see the attributes ...


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