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1

I opted for Cuckoo to automatize running the software on the guest machine and wrote a custom auxiliary analysis script to collect those metrics every second. The way to collect data is thus as secure as Cuckoo is so I guess better solutions could be found but at least there is a possibility to stream them as they are collected so that, in case of loss of ...


2

What should I be doing to prevent the application from breaking when I hex edit the new name in? Should I be searching for something else beside SbieDll.dll to replace? In the 80s, it was possible to open a program binary with a hex editor and change strings (on computers such as Atari ST, Amiga, etc.) and even then the size of the string had to remain ...


2

There's nothing "special" with AWS servers. If you can obtain the same exact operating-system image, you could use virtualization and a shared (preferably internal only) network to configure the network as same as AWS environment


3

You are conflating a lot of concepts together, so let me try to separate them. Virtual machines are a convenience of many purposes but enhancing anonymity is not one of them. Yes using a browser in a VM will give different indicators such as User-Agent and Fingerprint, but that’s just another set of tracking variables. It’s extremely difficult to configure ...


0

Are you accessing this website via Tor with an account you only registered in your tor browser on your VM? If not then you have already exposed your identity which is unfortunate. I'm not saying StackExchange would roll over and give up your info, but your ISP knows who you are and when you accessed stack exchange - matching this up with your question is ...


1

Traced by whom? If you mean traced by the evil maid then perhaps a VM running purely in memory would mean that your activity wasn't recoverable. A Linux boot CD springs to mind. You'd have to ensure that you flushed your memory of course. If you mean traced by your ISP in the sense that your ISP knows in general what you are doing then your ISP will ...


1

Using a traditional virtualization model, all components of the hypervisor and guest share physical hardware components. In this case, any attempt at protecting the VM from the host is purely obfuscation, and not by any means genuine protection. In order to protect a VM from a compromised hypervisor, you will in fact need hardware support for this software ...


3

VM's are an abstraction we refer to for convenience. The underlying reality is that it's all code running on the host. You can protect a non running VM file with encryption, but a running VM client is running on the host, with host memory and host CPU. The host has access to everything.


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