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43

Can I get my files back? How? Maybe. If you have backups, you can restore your files from there. Just make sure to completely reinstall your operating system first, i.e. "nuke from orbit", to remove the malware first. If you don't do that, you will just get infected again. If you don't have backups, things get trickier. Some ransomware has been beaten and ...


19

Although a lot depends on the anti-virus software, I'll try to answer your questions: 1) What is the best practice and secure way to deal with them? Delete from quarantine, or let them in there? Do you plan to study the virus and its working? If yes, then you might want to keep it (This will require a restore of the file). Do you think it might be a ...


16

A computer virus is just a file, is not something that will be magically activated by itself and wreak havoc around. You can treat it just like a normal file: delete it and it's gone. If you uninstall the AV, some will empty the quarantine directory, some not. In the event of the AV not clearing the quarantine, you will end up with a folder containing the ...


16

Should I pay the ransom? The inclination here is to post an emphatic HELL NO, tell them where they can stick their malware, and bid them a good day. No payouts for you, Mr. Neer-do-well! The company I work for was hit by the original cryptolocker (circa 2013) and we were able to do just that thanks to a simple but effective use of Windows Backup. Odds are,...


6

Some people think that breaking stuff is funny (or, in other words, they do it "for teh lulz"). It's possible there's some other explanations, of course - maybe they have an ethical objection to software piracy and think anybody who attempts it deserves to have their system wrecked, maybe the program attempted (or would have attempted, if given more time?) ...


3

Most of the ransomware attacks directed at US computers originate from countries which used to make up the USSR, to include Russia. I personally got hit with one of these about 3 years ago. It locked all my files, and booted a wordpad note saying I'd been hacked, and auto-took me to several websites saying I'd been hacked and demanding ransom. They wanted ...


2

Assuming that your knowledge about IT security is reflected in the question in that you cannot focus on your specific threats and risks since you don't know them, then the likelihood of getting hacked is high enough to be worried. Note that this is not meant to denounce your knowledge, most people don't know much about IT security. But if one is not ...


1

Honestly, I would grab a live CD of Linux, boot up the Live CD, and use that to mount the disk and the USB onto the filesystem and then copy the data over. I have done this repeatedly when my parent's Windows systems got infected. They always seemed to be in a rush to click on every link that they got in their email, LOL. https://www.online-tech-tips.com/...


1

Most malware doesn’t infect the drive itself but there is a chance. Most likely, the malware that would infect the drive runs when the OS boots. Boot the infected system from a cd rom or into recovery mode and then copy the files. Once the files are on the usb, you’d need to scan them.


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