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Anti-virus companies have a 'submit a sample' option but don't expect them to review it by hand in detail. They have automated dynamic behaviors analysis tools (i.e sandbox) to run those executable and see if any red flag is raised there. Virus Total also runs it in its sandbox and provide details to its users. Submitting there has much better affect than ...


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Use a free VPN to protect yourself against the sysadmin. Visit only reputable sites to protect against malware (what you asked). Make sure your desk is not against a window because glass reflects. Only watch. Wanking is unprofessional. Pentesting is ... gray area, as in "much better". Also VMs and spoofed MACs are a good idea indeed.


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It's true that zero-day could happen with any activity that causes a CPU cycle that consumes the file's content as data source. For example: it could happen when Thunderbird is saving the file to disk, if Thunderbird has a zero-day in file saving process. It could even happen when your anti-virus is scanning the file if your anti-virus has zero-day and they ...


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nV GPU vulnerabilities Just look at the link and amazed. NVIDIA GPU Display Driver contains a vulnerability in the NVIDIA Control Panel component, in which an attacker with local system access can corrupt a system file, which may lead to denial of service or escalation of privileges. NVIDIA CUDA Driver contains a vulnerability in the Inter Process ...


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Coming from a different question to this one I have to note that currently malware may reside in (from most common to least common): UEFI BIOS SSD/HDD flash ROM NIC/Ethernet flash ROM Old GPU ROM (modern GPUs ROMs are digitally signed and it's impossible to circumvent it) The development of malware for any of these ROMs costs astronomical amounts of money, ...


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To add to the above comments: I used this blogpost (in chinese) instructions to clean the system. Once your system gets compromised you can no longer trust it in any shape or form. The only surefire remedy is to wipe clean your entire drives. Also, the above links don't mention it but nowadays, but if we are talking about a personal PC/server malware can ...


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It's tricky. If you were just browsing a website in the VM then you're reasonably safe. If it managed to trick you into running a separate executable, then there is a chance that it could infect your host or other PCs on your network, if the VM wasn't properly isolated. (Using the same login credentials on the VM as on the host is the biggest no-no; using ...


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There may be many ways to get rid of keyloggers. For that, you have to work on its detection. Wireshark can help in detection, but depending on the usage pattern of the PC, it can be difficult to determine which traffic is harmless and which is malicious. This is what I would do if I suspect a keylogger transmitting data: If you can, put Wireshark on a 2nd ...


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TL,DR: Don't be worried, you are probably safe. Usually malware cannot escape the VM onto the host OS. There are exceptions, as some malware are designed specifically to break from the VM into the host, but those are very, very few and usually are seen on targeted attacks, not on a public internet site. Cross-OS malware infection are even rarer. Malware ...


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The App poses risks of exposing you and your personal information online due to poor implementation of security and vulnerabilities in the App. Get rid of the App. There are too many articles explaining the exploits and risks of using TikTok dating back to 2019. One example is the advertisement sub-domain had vulnerabilities of XSS. Two USER data exposed ...


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When you delete the app, then the account with your password still remains (in case you later decide to reinstall the app). It appears someone was trying to log into your Tik Tok account, couldn't, and then used the "forgot password" function. This doesn't necessarily mean malicious intent. It is possible that someone somewhere in the world ...


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