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Inbound Traffic It seems like the threat you are concerned about is "hacking", which I will interpret in this case as "exploitation of locally running network services by malicious actors". If this is your threat model, and we disregard out other privacy/security implications and potential benefits of using a VPN, I suspect the VPN has little to offer in ...


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You question isn't very clear. You wrote: I'm connecting to that server via VPN (wireguard). And after: I do not route all traffic through that VPN, only DNS requests. So, if the HTTP stream between your client and your server isn't routed throught VPN, then the connection isn't encrypted. At contrary, if you route the traffic to your HTTP server ...


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It protects your traffic between your device and the VPN gateway, preventing your ISP (or most governments) from performing a MiTM attack targeted toward you. However, once your traffic passes from the VPN gateway to its eventual destination, it becomes vulnerable to a MiTM attack. With a VPN, your traffic is then semi-anonymized, so it is much much more ...


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If someone is sitting between you and your router, then they will be able to get your data by using any sniffer. Once the connection is made from your router to vpn concentrator( vpn server), then they will be seeing only encrypted data which is of no value to the attacker.


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Despite not having services for users, some other potential justifications for a VPN would be: Network and admin teams access to L2/L3 devices like switches and routers RDP access to workstations Besides those, if you're not actually hosting any services on an internal network for users to VPN in for, then no there is no reason to have a VPN. In fact, ...


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Approach the same concept as cloud servers, all server nodes are in private subnets and just build a NAT/VPN gateway to expose your services. It's complicated to messing around with VPN and dockers just because you have to manually control the iptables rules on each node.


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The VPN provider can get your IP address. He can also assign your IP address to a specific location, like city or district. But this is done using databases that group IP ranges into locations. This doesn't mean that the IP address has to be at this location, but it's most-likely. And it is not the actual coordinates, but just the area. But your VPN ...


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