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22

Yes, probably. Most VPN protocols are not designed to hide the fact that they're VPN protocols, nor what kind of protocol they are. See for instance this paper which details fingerprinting OpenVPN. If you run all your traffic through a VPN, the fact that you're using a VPN is quite easily visible - as all traffic will be destined for a single destination - ...


6

To exploit the compression, as in CRIME/BREACH, the attacker must perform a chosen-plaintext attack. In other terms, this means that the attacker must already have an exploit on your computer: Either a RCE, in which case your VPN, encrypted or not, will not help you as you are already pwned; or a CSRF or similar, which is fairly uncommon on classical ...


5

It likely won't make a difference. The reason being is that the vast majority of traffic going through your VPN tunnel will already be encrypted at a different OSI layer. So the traffic that you see in your VPN tunnel will have very high entropy, and high entropy cannot be compressed. As a result, enabling compression will likely not change anything at all, ...


2

If your friend is using a proxy, all the requests will look as requests towards the IP of the proxy. Depending on your friend's parents' knowledge of networks, they might find that as a suspicious behavior. In normal cases where the average parents don't know much about proxies, there should not be any problem.


2

Yes they could, but they would need to do this actively. Some degree of effort is required. If you are one user in many that share an ISP connection there would need to be filtering, grouping going on. They also might not care. Your employer will care if you are breaking rules though. A disproportionate level of SSL traffic on 443 to a single address might ...


2

A VPN only protects the connection to the VPN exit, nothing more. It does not restrict what can be connected to and what information can be exchanged. A compromised browser could simply phone home through the VPN and submit all relevant information about what you are doing. A VPN will not prevent such phoning home but instead protects it like all the other ...


1

A compromised browser can do anything a browser could: submit something else, unbeknownst to you allowing others to snoop on your navigation show you something different from a web site's real content (this is no different than what an ad blocker does - the site has ads, and you don't see them. What is an "ad"? That is for the ad blocker's writer ...


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