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0

There's no such thing as "complete anonymity". Cookies aren't the only way to track a web user. Browsers can be uniquely fingerprinted, and they offer other persistent storage locations besides cookies. Allowing 3rd party cookies at all allows your activities to be tracked across different websites during your browsing session (usually by advertising ...


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First, you don't get complete anonymity just by using a VPN in the first place. A VPN will only reduce the tracking surface but not remove it. Similar removing cookies will only reduce the tracking surface further but not remove it too. There are still enough cached information in the browser outside of cookies and these can be used to track you. Removing ...


1

Most corporate VPN clients (by means of firewall and routing rules) intentionally insulate your computer from all other networks you may be connected to, when connecting to the corporate VPN. This is done in order to prevent your computer from being used as an intermediate for connecting to your corporate network from outside. When you connect to more than ...


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From my own experience it's not true that traffic over a phone hotspot is routet through the VPN Tunnel opened on the phone wheter on iOS nor on Android. You can verify this by checking a website which reveals your ip address on your laptop connected to the hotspot. If you wan't to have a VPN connection on your latptop you have to establish one from this ...


3

The corporate network is almost certainly segmented into multiple zones or security areas. Between them are firewalls and/or other security systems to control access to those areas. If you connect a machine that is not a properly configured security device to two networks at the same time, you are creating an uncontrolled bridge between these two networks. ...


0

The loaded page can contain some code that periodically polls data from the web site. This doesn't need to be a secret function. It can be a pretty normal one, e.g. the web site checks if there are any new messages on the server, e.g. it displays the online status of your friends. On each such request the server sees your current IP. If the loaded web page ...


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Depending on your routing table (corporate laptops may have defined route table entries), settings in your network adapters, having or not having a perimeter firewall which filters traffic for VPN users, IPS or IDS, when you connect to any two networks (cable + wifi, cable + hotspot ad hoc) (cable + cable) (bridged) (if network is setup as shared) the hosts ...


27

The risk is not really for your own system but for the corporate network. I assume that the private network is only connected to internet through a secured firewall, and that through the VPN you get access to that private network. If you manage to have your machine connected at the same time to a public network and to the VPN, it will constitute a new ...


2

When you enable/disable a VPN your IP address changes but your browser doesn't. A web application can easily track you regardless of your IP address by using cookies and a variety of other methods. In fact, the IP address doesn't matter at all for tracking purposes - a user on a mobile phone will have their IP address change frequently by simply walking out ...


2

NordVPN uses /var/run/nordvpnd.sock to allow the nordvpn client tool to communicate with the nordvpnd daemon (which is running as root).


0

By adding VPN, you are also reaching a critical unusability threshold for marginal security improvement. Consider the decision as a time-cost vs security matter. If you have 1000 staff, and you are wasting 1 hour of time per week, that's 1000 hours per week. What if that time budget was spent on hardening the software implementation instead? You should ...


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While your assumption #1 is true, whitelisting your corporate IP means that anybody in your company can have access to that application, even though they might be blocked by the SSO. Using a StS VPN helps here because you can use subnets and only allow people in specific subnets to have access to the application. Also, if you have a corporate WiFi and a ...


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Site-to-site VPN does not authenticate individual users or machines, it only guaranties that the traffic only flows between two networks (our office and our cloud provider). If the source of the traffic is restricted by its IP and the destination is authenticated by its valid SSL certificate, isn't it the same? That is true, VPN in this case does ...


4

When you say "disabled" I will assume you mean "disconnected" from the VPN. I will also assume this is a company asset and not a personal asset. You can't be completely sure based on the information you gave, but I would say generally no based on the research I've done and based on my manual poking around our Palo Alto admin console (and local log ...


1

No, using two VPNs (desktop + browser) does not increase your privacy. Your best option is to use Tor + VPN, ideally on a VM, such as Tails. To give you a better understanding about the privacy implications about VPN providers, I have copied this great post from this GitHub repository, which is published under the WTFPL. Don't use VPN services. No,...


1

great question! First, lets break down what browser and standard VPN can do: Standard VPN will tunnel ALL your traffic through VPN server. Browser VPN will tunnel ONLY the traffic sent to websites. Tunneling - meaning that the data sent from your requests (or OS requests) will be encrypted, and will be sent to VPN server. The VPN server will decrypt it, ...


1

It seem a but premature to make a VPN decision based on post quantum protection considerations, at this time. I think much more important questions would be, company reputation and past actions. None/few of the major trusted VPN providers, I see have that as a feature and my speculation is that any services using the new crypto is likely still experimental,...


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I really love the power and convenience of running SOCKS5 via ssh to my own server out in the data center (as the posted pointed out). TAhough I think I use the syntax "ssh -f -Nn -D $LOCAL:$LPORT -p $RPORT $USER@$HOST". Not only does this securely tunnel my DNS requests and on line banking and DNS requests securely past my ISPs prying eyes (once you ...


2

A browser based VPN is not actually a virtual private network but instead an encrypted tunnel to a proxy server. Since it is integrated in the browser it is unlikely to cause DNS leaks. All DNS will instead be resolved by the proxy at the end of the encrypted tunnel. Such a browser based "VPN" will only cover traffic originating in the browser. What you ...


0

If you are actually connected to a VPN (just using an extension may not be enough, you may need to activate it or log into the VPN server or something as well) then no, your ISP cannot see the sites you visit, even non-https sites, if you use a good VPN. Apparently a surprisingly large number of VPN services out there rely on your local configuration to look ...


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