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It turns out it can monitor all online activity as requests are only encrypted once submitted and seeing that the software resides on the machine it already captures the browser history before encryption is applied. Excellent software!


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How it creates the private channel on the internet It creates a connection between the VPN entry (usually directly on the client) and the VPN exit and then encapsulates all traffic into this connection. Imagine a train which transports passengers between two stations instead of the passengers walking this way by themselves. The "private" comes ...


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Yes. Some VPN will place all connected computers on the same net, without client isolation, thus you could jump from one computer of an employee to another (and from those to their home network, too!). Even if you can't do lateral movement between clients, it may be possible between different servers to which those users connect to.


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No, Paypal should not be able to figure out that you are accessing the account from Pakistan if you are using TeamViewer to access it "from Dubai." This is provided you do not login to Paypal from Pakistan again, or within a short time period of accessing it "in Dubai."


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Correct, you just internet search for "what is my ip". You are looking to see if that number is different than your expected home IP address. To get your home IP address, you might check on another computer (or smartphone on wifi) that isn't running Tor, to see what your own IP address is and compare. You might also choose to use a geoip database ...


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You should read this blog - https://blog.bolehvpn.net/tor-over-vpn-vpn-over-tor-which-is-better/ it suggests connecting to TOR through a VPN to generally offer higher security, while connecting to a VPN through TOR generally provides better anonymity. While both have their own advantages and disadvantages, you would still need to trust your VPN provider as ...


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You should look into TOR browser if you're looking to browse the web for the most part anonymously. It's a little more beginner friendly than tails. To answer your question directly, yes, the easiest way to verify you are accessing the web via a TOR exit node is to go to google or DuckDuckGo and type 'whats is my IP' before then after you connect through TOR ...


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An encrypted VPN out of country is the classic approach. Set up correctly, all the ISP will see is that there is an encrypted tunnel to the VPN. Common VPN errors include: Failing to make sure that all of the DNS traffic moves through the VPN Failing to make sure the connection drops completely with no auto reconnect in the event the VPN is disrupted. ...


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The first part was already described quite detailed by mti2935: with an vpn you add a step of going to the vpn which is encrypted. With no VPN: For encrypted traffic (like HTTPS) the ISP can view to which domain you are connecting to For plaintext traffic (like HTTP) the ISP can view to which domain you are connecting to, as well as the whole contents sent ...


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For sake of simplicity, lets assume you do all of your web browsing using HTTPS. Now, first consider the case where you aren't using a VPN. So, your traffic is routed through the ISP, then on to its final destination. Then, suppose you browse to https://www.somewebsite.com/. Your ISP can not see the information that you exchange back and forth between ...


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I would recommend contacting local police and reporting that incident as well as contacting other international authorities. Usually, such threats are being fought by special cyber units. I would not recommend contacting the blackmailers or reacting to their provocations. Just compose a descriptive detailed report and send it to the police. Sometimes ...


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