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1

Most reputed VPN organizations have a "no log" policy and generally will encrypt your traffic. If your ISP was hacked, your data such as Internet history would be directly traceable back to you, which is not the case if you use a VPN to browse the internet. Some countries even take torrenting seriously, so if you're an avid user of torrents, using a VPN ...


1

Attackers can track your connection while they are in your network. Your ISP can track your connection. Also, somehow, attackers can find your IP address and attack you or learn your some informations like location, ISP. So, you I recommend you to use a VPN. You should be careful while choosing a VPN.


1

The assumptions here is that the VPN provider is running from a country that are one or more: have more freedom than your own, especially if you live in oppressive or very conservative countries, your local internet provider or government may block content/site to materials that they do not want you to have access to (e.g. politically sensitive materials, ...


0

If the hacker sees your VPN subscription details (username and password) he might have all the information you have. Unless access to the VPN is protected by an additional factor the hacker does not have or know, the hacker can then use you VPN credentials too. Such additional factors might by physical or software based multi-factor authentication. It ...


1

It is not really a "tunnel" actually only the connection between you and the Server is encrypted. This is calles a remote-access-VPN However there is also a thing called site-to-site VPN which is used to connect whole network with ech other in an encrypted way. I assume you have some sort of client software which usually means you are using the remote ...


6

Yes, Web Control doesn't care whether you're using a direct connection, a VPN, or a proxy server. If you want to do something and you're worried about your university seeing logs, then you better use a personal computer. You can pretty safely assume that everything you do on their laptop is available for them to scrutinize.


0

Unless I am missing something but the solution could be to share that key using a password manager. Not naming any service but this could be a great solution. In case the org does not use a password manager, there is great open source service onetime secret. You can investigate their code on GitHub


0

The client connects to the VPN server using HTTPS, presents himself there in a way they deem acceptable (usually by filling a sign up form, perhaps also performing a payment). The VPN server provides him the data he needs for the connection (that included the preshared key). Your approach of "created an app that will take any phrase, encrypt it and provide ...


1

It depends on a couple factors, but I would say your network is safe. If your VPN is configured to be an "Always-on VPN" and "Block connections without VPN" is set, any application running on the mobile will only have access to the VPN and nothing else. If the ROM you installed is used by thousands of users and you got it from a reputable source, you are ...


2

A VPN sits on top of, and is dependent on, the Operating System and the hardware. If the Operating System or the hardware is custom, it can simply choose to ignore the VPN for its malicious activity. That means that it is possible for the compromised phone to attack the network at will, targetting the WiFi Access Point/Router or creating an "Evil Twin" ...


-2

Does it really matter what country the vpn is based in? wouldn't it be better if it is based in your home country, as it will have to follow privacy laws in that country? Well, in most of time this is a "speedy" problem rather than a security problem, your connection with a server based in mainland China can be slow or fast depending on were you live, if ...


3

Today practically all of the information sent on the Internet is encrypted. There are only a few exceptions. This encryption is typically unbreakable by an ISP (you see warnings in browser windows, or your applications don't work et al). They might be breakable by some governmental agents. There are only a few exceptions. However, even an encrypted ...


0

If you consider that the network between the VPN's endpoint and the OAuth2 server is safe (because request are reencrypted, or it's a "trusted network"), then an HTTPS tunnel or a VPN tunnel offers the same level of security (encryption and authentication). However, as stated in section 3.1.2.1 of the OAuth2 RFC: The redirection endpoint SHOULD require ...


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