New answers tagged

1

Looking at a random patch shows adding the axis class to a deny list (historically known as a 'blacklist'). Deny lists are bodges. It's not a case of having code that uses axis - it only matters whether the axis class is present (accessible by the relevant class loader instance). As with many vulnerabilities of this type, the reference to the 'helpful' class ...


1

I agree with Sibwara. Maintaining a bunch of different versions of Jackson in the same project is building in some technical debt and should be avoided. For this specific CVE, the effort to prove Jackson is not using axis2-jaxws somewhere may be greater than just upgrading all instances of Jackson to the latest version. And what about all the other CVEs ...


2

I have the same reading as you about the fact that only the axis2-jaxws is concerned. However, not using this module in your project could not be sufficient if you are using other parts of jackson whose make call to this vulnerable axis2-jaxws. In order to be sure, you should inspect every part of jackson you are using, check their dependencies (if axis2-...


11

Tools like Metasploit can be used to automate this process. The tool scans the target host for open ports, then attempts to identify the services running on these ports, then attempts to exploit known vulnerabilities in these services. These tools can also be used to find and exploit vulnerabilities resulting common mistakes made by developers, such as SQL ...


24

Basically some tools (like nmap) try to open session over each port of a target. If the session is opened, the tool will try to dialog with the port in every way it knows (http, ftp, smtp, mysql, ...) until it finds the good protocol. For UDP, the first step is omitted as this is a sessionless protocol. Before trying every protocol, the scanner can often ...


Top 50 recent answers are included