4

The answer is in your warning: found that it is malicious. When a malevolent person creates a malicious pdf, (s)he wants as many victims as possible. So , adding a wagon-load of keywords attracts readers (you in this case), and therewith possible infected computers.


3

Instagram can't, and isn't, doing that. Chrome is. Chrome knows your Google account because you've signed in to it, and they know that you have your Instagram credentials saved in your Google account, so when you visit the Instagram website, they offer to sign in automatically for you. I don't know why this would trigger in Incognito mode; that seems like a ...


2

Different browsers do this differently, but in general: If you want to make your passwords unreadable for other software on your computer, you'll need to set a master password that you have to enter before you can access your ordinary passwords. Without a master password, the browser has no secret to derive an encryption key from. Sure, it could just pick ...


2

This is a relic of the original Internet addressing scheme, now retronymed 'classful' and obsolete almost 3 decades. See e.g. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/29285954/wsastringtoaddress-thinks-1-2-3-is-a-valid-ip-address or more officially http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/inet_addr.html . Note that 0.0.0.0 itself, in whatever ...


2

It depends on the kind of malware. If it's just a malicious browser extension with no outside-of-the-browser components - which you can test by disabling all browser extensions and seeing if the problem goes away - then it's easy. All you'd need to do is delete (and possibly report) the malicious extension. Of course, the attacker could still have had all ...


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