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If I had the means to automatically detect a 0-day exploit in a piece of software, the vendor of that software has the same potential, thus these exploits would be caught before the software was ever released. Such things are done, of course, and they are called Source Code Analysis. They do exactly what you are trying to do: Automatically look for ...


3

Why would a web application try to connect to a port on localhost? A simple explanation that doesn't involve malicious acting is developmental tasks. Depending on the environment, some developers may install a local, lightweight copy of the backend API on their development machine. This would allow the frontend code to try and connect to localhost and do ...


2

Running Firefox in private browsing, it will have enabled Tracking protection. With tracking protection enabled, it won't be loading recaptcha (since that serves as a tracker for Google). You should see a partial shield on the url bar noting that. Now, by not loading recaptcha, it is relatively common that the page doesn't even show a sign that there ...


2

A 0-day exploit is an exploit which is not yet known to the public, specifically the vendor. As such, statistics about such exploits are difficult to make. But in order to make this answer more satisfactory, we can have a deeper look into how 0-day exploits are dealt with. When would you use a 0-day exploit? Most likely, you will use a 0-day exploit when ...


1

Some browsers block the download attribute when the file is not accessed by the same protocol, on the same host and over the same port. This is called SOP (Same Origin Policy). This to me sounds a bit pointless while it breaks a lot of good use cases to prevent something that can be circumvented in other ways. Same Origin Policy is not pointless. ...


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