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3

Enable the Chrome flag Block insecure private network requests. chrome://flags/#block-insecure-private-network-requests


1

What you're asking for is a hands-off, unauthenticated way to say "I'm the same client you saw yesterday". There's already an answer for that: cookies. Adding self-issued client certificates adds a lot of complexity but solves no problems. There's nothing to trust on a self-signed certificate. Adding CA-signed client certificates removes ...


0

Here is my two cents to this: The easiest change for me was to use other browser like Librefox (a Firefox modification). This browser changes many fingerprint variables including the user-agent. https://github.com/intika/Librefox The next is a project that creates a local proxy chain: Application <--port 3128--> Squid <--port 8118--> ...


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If its a personal laptop, they cant get your browsing history. Also, even if your are signed in to your work account, your search history on bing cannot be shared as confirmed by Microsoft. "Your specific work search history isn't shared with your company or other companies, including Microsoft." Reference: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...


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For example can it track the ID of the browser (if there is such thing), or the ID of the computer / internet session? No,If you changed chrome user account and the gmail associated with it and didn't use any sync methods,all the cookies and data would be invalidated from the first user to the second,there would be no sure way for example.com to figure it ...


2

how is two people using two accounts on the same device different from one user using two accounts in the same device from the point of view of example.com? Nothing. example.com may know that there is two accounts connected to itself on the same device and even know that accounts are open in the same browser, but can only guess whether it is the same person ...


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tl/dr: It's definitely a plugin doing this, and is almost certainly a privacy-focused plugin that is trying to randomly obfuscate your user agent and plugin list to hide you from sites performing browser fingerprinting. However it is doing it very poorly and I'm dubious that the people who wrote this knew what they were doing. So while there likely isn't a ...


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So it's only happening on that one computer, other machines don't see this, correct? I've seen something similar before and it was a compromised JavaScript remote library call. If it's only on the one computer, it may be a hosts file issue directing the library call to a compromised site. If it's on all machines, it may be a compromised library itself. In ...


2

If its on their machine then that eliminates a major attack vector but doesnt necessarily eliminate all of them. I would want to make sure that it is indeed them typing in the formula. There are all different types of scenarios to think about here. What if somebody sends them a spreadsheet and they open it up? Will it execute? What if some social engineering ...


3

For people looking at this question now - this may be a better (updated) answer: https://webauthn.guide/ From the site: The Web Authentication API (also known as WebAuthn) is a specification written by the W3C and FIDO, with the participation of Google, Mozilla, Microsoft, Yubico, and others. The API allows servers to register and authenticate users using ...


0

Yes, you can get hacked by just clicking a link. Consider what happens when you install an extension in your browser? That's a link. Also, who said that your browser cache and history is completely secure? Most of us have our bank account details and other sensitive information stored there. You click a link and foreign code is downloaded and run on your ...


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