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94

Network encryption protects against different set of threats than application layer encryption like TLS. In particular, network encryption like Wifi encryption are primarily designed to protect from a local attacker from being able to watch network patterns (by recording who you're making connections with, and discovering what devices are on the local ...


26

Why do we not just authorize each end device? We do. Well, somewhat. The traditional Pre-Shared Key (PSK) model authenticates devices by them having access to the PSK. This is not the only way to do things, and your question mentions MAC addresses. This is generally insecure, since wireless devices necessarily broadcast their MAC address with every packet ...


11

In addition to the greats answers already posted, I would add that having people on your WiFi is not only a threat to the confidentiality of your exchanges. It is also a threat to your endpoints, since the attacker can now access all sorts of devices that would be otherwise not exposed from the outside (IoT, printers, computers themselves, NAS, servers and ...


6

The higher education institution that I attend uses Eduroam If you are using eduroam, then you are connecting to your wireless network with some form of 802.1X authentication and the wireless infrastructure must support WPA2/AES per eduroam requirements (they may additionally support WPA or TKIP). 802.1X uses a supplicant on the client device that ...


5

Wifi security has been around for a lot longer than it was standard for every website to use https. Go back 5 or so years and a very large chunk of the internet was unencrypted. Wifi security was providing a very real and large benefit in this time which is why the advice of not using cafe wifi for sensitive uses was and is such a prevalent piece of advice. ...


3

They would have very limited visibility even if they went out of their way to configure it; on top of that, I would not expect them to do so. They could scan your network and identify devices by IP and host name; a good scanner will often identify OS as well. Active measures of this sort are (a) detectable and (b) highly uncommon on user workstations. ...


2

A VPN sits on top of, and is dependent on, the Operating System and the hardware. If the Operating System or the hardware is custom, it can simply choose to ignore the VPN for its malicious activity. That means that it is possible for the compromised phone to attack the network at will, targetting the WiFi Access Point/Router or creating an "Evil Twin" ...


1

It is not really a "tunnel" actually only the connection between you and the Server is encrypted. This is calles a remote-access-VPN However there is also a thing called site-to-site VPN which is used to connect whole network with ech other in an encrypted way. I assume you have some sort of client software which usually means you are using the remote ...


1

To provide a contrary point of view, famed cryptographer Bruce Schneier once posted an article discussing why he has an open wifi network. This article generated a large amount of debate (links at the end of that article), with some security professionals supporting, and some opposing. Schneier's main security argument for not encrypting his own wifi is that ...


1

Ugh... There are soooooooo many edges, and the problem is that while you must get 500 things right to be [more or less] safe, you only need to get one wrong, and be unsafe. I daresay it is even impossible to list all things to be aware of. Certainly, there are some things that are more important to Joe Average than others, but none of them is truly "security ...


1

If you've got physical access to a network, you can make it completely unusable. This is especially a problem for wireless networks, because you have no way of limiting the physical access; it's also becoming a bit of a problem in modern "private cloud" hosting - you only need to compromise one machine to compromise the whole network. The simplest method ...


1

It depends on a couple factors, but I would say your network is safe. If your VPN is configured to be an "Always-on VPN" and "Block connections without VPN" is set, any application running on the mobile will only have access to the VPN and nothing else. If the ROM you installed is used by thousands of users and you got it from a reputable source, you are ...


1

There are two underlying different questions here. What is technically possible from the work laptop. The laptop could host some attack kits that scan the other hosts on the network for possible vulnerabilities, or scan the network activity. The former attack could have almost unlimited possibilities - in fact the limitation is just how secure is you home ...


1

If your employer installed some sniffer software on your work laptop, which intercepts all possible packets, then it can monitor what is happening in your home network. The results can be sent from your work laptop to employer directly via network or later on, when you are in your employers network. If you don't trust your employer and want to be sure that ...


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