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16

Using a guest WiFi for IoT devices is essentially just a practical, easy to understand implementation for network segmentation. The goal is to prevent lateral movement between and from IoT devices. As a typical user isn't aware of such terminology and how this should be implemented, this might actually be a good tip. However, in order to increase security, ...


6

The premise of the question is slightly wrong. A better way to ask is as follows: Should my TV or other IoT device connect to my main home network? NO. Should it connect to the my guest wifi? Again, NO. Ideally, you want IoT devices to connect to their own separate IoT network. Rationale: The question inherently assumes the guest network is password ...


3

Unless you are not using any security at all on your Wifi, no. Nobody but those connected can read anything. Please don't tell me your network is unprotected. If you have your network "protected" by WEP, someone can crack the password in minutes, and begin decrypting the traffic. But if you use WPA2, it's very difficult. No matter what protection ...


1

Assuming the attacker got your WiFi password but NOT your router administration password (they are not the same thing!), then it's unlikely the attacker can do anything to re-establish access to your network. In theory they could have attacked devices on your network (such as your PC, phone, IoT/"Smart Home", or the router itself) to attempt to ...


1

Some tools can already do this, notably airodump-ng, which will show a list of clients and the network they are currently associated with. The tool can filter by open networks. QoS data is typically used for the data, but will usually be unintelligible due to encryption, and would need to be processed by another dissector in order to see the payload anyway.


1

Yes, your wireless traffic can be captured without connecting to your network. If it is unencrypted, an attacker may read it. HTTPS traffic is always encrypted. Whether HTTP traffic is encrypted depends on the configuration of your wireless access point, which in your case seems to be integrated into the SOHO router. The same goes for intercepted wireless ...


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