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Was typing in my password into an HTTPS website ... When I type in Username123 Password123 Can the internet provider see it just like that? Typically, no. The application-layer data you mentioned (username/password) is encrypted via Transport Layer Security (TLS) as it is passed from the application-layer to the transport layer. In principle, only the web ...


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Using a strong password is enough. If you use a pseudorandom password of 19 characters, that will give you a key with about ~113 bits of entropy. NIST requires symmetric keys of at least 112 bits so you should be fine with a 19 character pseudorandom alphanumeric password, even if the password is being cracked on a supercomputer. In fact, normally, your WiFi ...


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Get a VPN, such as Mullvad, to encrypt your connections to public networks. is my private information (Banking info, private photos, etc) in danger? If they don't use TLS (HTTPS), then yes. An attacker could view or modify any data. Could someone spy on me through my webcam? Not passively. They'd have to manage to get you to execute malicious software on ...


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Can drivers? Yes. Most Windows (and Linux and Mac) drivers run in kernel mode and have full access to the operating system, including the parts that store the list of drivers. They can erase themselves from that list (and similar lists) and still continue to operate. It would have to be done on purpose, maliciously. Plus, Device Manager shows devices, not ...


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As @hft's answer points out, no, your ISP typically cannot read HTTPS traffic. However, they can tell the length of traffic sent each way (possibly not precisely if a block cipher is used), which is sometimes enough to determine some things about the encrypted traffic. They can also see when data is sent each way - how many requests (and responses) are made (...


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Using the WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup) button is generally considered a secure method. For two minutes after that, your access point will accept new devices onto the network, but not after, which means that the scope for attack is limited. If you are concerned, most access points allow you to find the connected devices to your network, and you can verify ...


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