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The second part of the listing is listing stations, a.k.a clients - computers and mobile phones that your chip captured either communicating with access points, or sending discovery beacons. Your screenshot lists 4 clients, 4 of which are associated with ("connected to") XX:AC:D2:41:22:AC, which is the single access point you've been able to discover, while ...


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As mentioned in the comments, WiFi is most definitely more secure, as long as you use WPA2. Do not configure your phone hotspot to open, or to use WEP, as one is completely without encryption, and the WEP is completely broken and has been for a long time. Also make your password some random combination of numbers and letters, as you can still crack WPA2, if ...


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Your question can be looked at from two different sides: Technically: it is possible to monitor activity from any computer if the right tools are installed. Maybe you've connected to those sites for a couple of minutes using the company laptop. Privacy: They shouldn't be monitoring your activity unless you have signed an agreement for that. My advice: ...


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The other answer is technically correct in saying that it is possible to monitor your network from a device on the network. Sure, any adversary controlled device could potentially be used to pivot and attack other parts of your network, including monitoring. But, the key word there is adversary. A legitimate company would not be actively attacking your ...


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I basically copy and pasted your question into google and the answer is yes. There are also multiple questions similar to this one: Can my employer see what I do on the internet when I am connected to the company network? On top of my personal knowledge, when it comes to your person device, as long as your work device is connected to your home network, it ...


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Rather than definitively say that uPNP is secure by design, or insecure by design, it makes more sense to specify what it actually facilitates - what hosts on the local network can do with uPNP that they couldn't otherwise. In a NAT situation, any host on the inside is already able to "open up a port", simply by sending a packet out on that port. But, that ...


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Programs like TMAC spoofs you machines address as if it was a new product that has 1 been used before or 2 never been used or recognized by the network. The complementary pass becomes available again immediately, where it usually is available once every 30 days per Machine code.


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The WiFi parental controls might be focused on certain protocol traffic (e.g. HTTP) and not other protocol traffic, like VPN. Meaning that the controls are not on the hardware level, but the traffic level (i.e. "this device accessing the web at this time"). The router manual might have clues as to how the filtering works.


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The MAC address can be spoofed quite easily. A live distribution like Tails will even spoof it by default. So MAC address filtering is not considered an effective security measure in itself, but may be good enough for your purpose. Also, in the case of wifi clients, the radio traffic can be sniffed passively over the air using tools like airodump, and it's ...


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