231

it is possible to render a key fob useless by pressing the button at least 256 times while out of the range of the car. Not useless, but desynchronized. Any car will allow you to re-synchronize, and one example of a typical procedure is: Turn the ignition key on and off eight times in less than 10 seconds. This tells the security system in the car to ...


204

The 802.11 specification that describes WPA2 (802.11i) is behind a paywall, and was designed by a few key individuals at the IEEE. The standard was reviewed by engineers, not by cryptographers. The details of the functionality (e.g. retransmission) were not widely known about or studied by security professionals. Cryptographer Matthew D Green wrote a blog ...


199

Warning: Conjecture, because none of us know their actual setup. It is very likely that the organization has their own network, which is hard-wired, as well as a guest network, which is wireless-only. The two are separate networks. This is a common layout because laying wire to desks is expensive, but worth it, for your own employees; broadcasting ...


172

Citing the relevant parts from https://www.krackattacks.com: Who is vulnerable? Both clients and access points are listed in the paper as being vulnerable. See the tables 1 and 2 on pages 5 and 8 for examples of vulnerable systems, and table 3 on page 12 for an overview of which packets can be decrypted. The weaknesses are in the Wi-Fi standard itself, ...


93

Be very, very careful. It's not KRACK that is the problem, it is a lax attitude to security and privacy in general. So called "smart" consumer products can often be hijacked, accessed from the internet, or monitored. As a customer, it is hard to know if any specific product is safe or not. The Norwegian Consumer Council has been on the case for a while, and ...


91

Enforce Consequences for Students Found on the Network The first thing you need to do is ensure you have a written policy outlining what devices are allowed on the network. However, if you are not consistent in the enforcement of your policy, it is useless. This should also cover the usage policies for the Teachers, including locking their computers when ...


87

Overview First, I learned a lot of my information from a combination of my amateur radio experience and an awesome talk I sat in at DEFCON 18. The majority of satellite systems are simple repeaters. The signal that comes in on a transponder is cleaned, amplified, and retransmitted. If you know the location and input frequency, and you pump more effective ...


73

In some sense, it feels like this should have been obvious. Remember Heartbleed, Shellshock, POODLE, TLS Triple Handshake attack, "goto fail", ... ? In hindsight, most of these problems seem to be obvious and could have been prevented if the right people just had a closer look at the right time at the right place. But, there is only a limited amount of ...


60

From a layman point, Yes its a design flaw and yes the signals are boosted to unlock the cars from far far away. This is knows as Relay Station Attack(RSA). Some of the ways to mitigate such attacks are: measuring Group delay time to detect illegal high values measuring Third-order intercept point to detect illegal Intermodulation products measuring Field ...


54

If someone knows my wifi password (be it WEP or WPA) what can they see on my screen? Do they just see URLs I visit, or can they see everything in my browser,....or can they see everything I do on my computer? Does using HTTPS make any difference? They can't see anything on your screen (unless you've enabled some sort of unencrypted remote desktop screen ...


52

You are trying to solve the wrong problem. They are thousands and you are one. Since you are not a security expert (as far as I understand, sorry if I'm mistaken) and they aren't either but they are a horde, you are just bound to lose if you fight a conventional war. @AviD gave a great answer in a comment: Here is a non-technical idea: This is a school, ...


51

I have a car with such a keyless entry system. My dad saw a report about those ADAC findings on TV and he had an idea which works: By placing the key in a steel can like the one above, the car does not detect the key any longer, so I figure range extenders would not pick up the key's signal either. Of course, this is annoying as it defeats the whole purpose ...


50

More details here. High-end manufacturers use expensive challenge-response schemes (the key sends a request, the car answers with a challenge, and the key sends a reply derived from the challenge with some algorithm). Even so, such algorithms are proprietary, usually not reviewed, and could well be an example of "rolling your own crypto". There are ...


49

Monitor mode: Sniffing the packets in the air without connecting (associating) with any access point. Think of it like listening to people's conversations while you walk down the street. Promiscuous mode: Sniffing the packets after connecting to an access point. This is possible because the wireless-enabled devices send the data in the air but only "mark" ...


48

Fairly easy to be honest, all you need is to do is listen for Probe Requests. There is a nice blog explaining how to go about setting up a computer with BT5 to listen for them here. With a networking card that supports "Monitor mode", you are able to pick up so called "Probe requests". Once the networking card is set up to be in monitor mode you can use ...


45

A typical rolling code fob from a decade ago which used a 64-bit payload would unlock if it received one code that was within 16 of what it was expecting, or two consecutive codes that were within 32768 of what it was expecting and adjacent to each other. Pushing the button 32768 times would cause a fob to become sufficiently desynchronized as to be useless,...


42

First of all that would entirely depend on the encryption used by the access point. There are several types of possible encryption. Mostly on consumer wireless access points these are: WEP WPA WPA2 WPS WEP Let's first dive into WEP. WEP was the first algorithm used to secure wireless access points. Unfortunately it was discovered that WEP had some ...


41

Instead of continuing in the comments, I think I will just answer your real question, which I understand to be - why is using WPA/WPA2 Personal with a public SSID and Passphrase not more secure than having an open network, and why doesn't WPA/WPA2 Enterprise work in the coffee shop scenario. If the passphrase was public (as it would be in this scenario) ...


38

From a security perspective, I think you are asking the wrong question. WPA2 is the basic answer. But it's entirely incomplete! A more complete answer will view WPA2 as one component of your wireless network defence. Of course there's strong encryption methods using certificates/vpn etc but these are too difficult for most people to set up and are usually ...


38

They're both evil. You shouldn't be connecting to any "Free Public Wifi" without assuming that all your unencrypted traffic will be monitored and modified. The best solution is to not connect to public networks at all, but if that's not an option for you then you can protect yourself a little more by specifying your own DNS (rather than letting the router ...


30

The paper describing KRACK discusses this very issue in section 6.6. A couple of points: There were ambiguities in the specification. Also formal proofs of specification are based on a model of the specification, and there are times when that model does not match the actual specification, much less matching the implementations based on that specification.


28

It really depends on how they have set up their network, so we can only speculate. But I can provide a similar anecdote. My local library has a wifi that you can log into using your library card. Several rooms have ethernet ports in the wall, but when I asked if I could plug in, I was told that the ethernet goes straight to the back-end network with access ...


27

In a nutshell, WPA2 is currently the most secure wireless security scheme. Personal and Enterprise It supports two main modes of authentication, known as WPA2-Personal and WPA2-Enterprise. The former utilises a pre-shared key (PSK) and is generally considered to be most suitable for home networks, whereas the latter is 802.1x which requires an ...


25

What would be required to hack a satellite (in general terms, any hack really)? When it comes to satellites, the word general does not apply. Almost every satellite, with very few exceptions is custom. Even the currently orbiting GPS satellites are not all the same: there are GPS IIA, GPS IIR, GPS IIR-M, and GPS IIF. I would venture that even satellites of ...


24

Traditionally there hasnt been an easy user-oriented method to detect evil twin attacks. Most attempts to detect an evil twin attack (ETA) are geared towards the administrator of a network where they basically have the authorised network admins scanning and comparing wireless traffic. This isnt so much of what you are interested in. There is a paper here (...


21

Tell the barrista/clerk/etc the wifi has gone down, can they reboot the router. Most people will happily do so, bringing the AP down for a moment, and exposing the evil twin router in the process as any active network that survives a power cycle. If there is more than 1 evil twin router, this still works. If there are multiple good routers, this would ...


21

The problem with the attack as you're describing it is that it's glossing over a lot of details about how keyless entry and start systems work, and details about built-in backup systems, some of which have been covered in comments on the question and other answers. First, let's cover getting into the vehicle: In other words: could the attack described in ...


20

Ethernet Before I get flamed by everyone who says iPads don't have ethernet ports, this is simply a single layer of "security". In most cases teachers should be able to use their laptops with a physical ethernet BASE-100TX CAT5+ plain old physical cable. You will have reduced the attack surface area (as the keys won't be on the teacher's laptops anymore). ...


20

If passwords are leaking like that, you may have a bigger problem than restricting Wifi access. It sounds as if the kids could do almost anything a teacher can do (including manipulate exam results?) and are routinely doing so at your location. It sounds as if a little bit of teacher education would solve this, after some detective work to narrow down the ...


20

If you truly fear an RFID proximity relay attack, such that you would keep the key fob in a Faraday cage in your pocket, you must recognize that you will be giving up all the convenience of proximity, plus other inconveniences. You'll have to carry some kind of larger container, and you'll have to open it to take out the key to use the remote or the key. I ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible