237 votes
Accepted

Does pressing a car remote many times offer denial of service attack for rolling codes?

it is possible to render a key fob useless by pressing the button at least 256 times while out of the range of the car. Not useless, but desynchronized. Any car will allow you to re-synchronize, and ...
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  • 50.5k
202 votes
Accepted

Why wasn't the KRACK exploit discovered sooner?

The 802.11 specification that describes WPA2 (802.11i) is behind a paywall, and was designed by a few key individuals at the IEEE. The standard was reviewed by engineers, not by cryptographers. The ...
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  • 131k
201 votes
Accepted

Company claims hardwire connections are a security issue

Warning: Conjecture, because none of us know their actual setup. It is very likely that the organization has their own network, which is hard-wired, as well as a guest network, which is wireless-only....
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  • 71.3k
174 votes
Accepted

Consequences of the WPA2 KRACK attack

Citing the relevant parts from https://www.krackattacks.com: Who is vulnerable? Both clients and access points are listed in the paper as being vulnerable. See the tables 1 and 2 on pages 5 and 8 ...
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  • 31.8k
93 votes

Trying to keep high school students out of the Wi-Fi network

Enforce Consequences for Students Found on the Network The first thing you need to do is ensure you have a written policy outlining what devices are allowed on the network. However, if you are not ...
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  • 3,971
92 votes
Accepted

How safe are wifi enabled talking toys?

Be very, very careful. It's not KRACK that is the problem, it is a lax attitude to security and privacy in general. So called "smart" consumer products can often be hijacked, accessed from ...
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  • 64.2k
72 votes

Why wasn't the KRACK exploit discovered sooner?

In some sense, it feels like this should have been obvious. Remember Heartbleed, Shellshock, POODLE, TLS Triple Handshake attack, "goto fail", ... ? In hindsight, most of these problems seem to be ...
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60 votes

How to patch "keyless entry" car keys?

From a layman point, Yes its a design flaw and yes the signals are boosted to unlock the cars from far far away. This is knows as Relay Station Attack(RSA). Some of the ways to mitigate such attacks ...
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52 votes

Trying to keep high school students out of the Wi-Fi network

You are trying to solve the wrong problem. They are thousands and you are one. Since you are not a security expert (as far as I understand, sorry if I'm mistaken) and they aren't either but they are ...
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  • 746
51 votes

How to patch "keyless entry" car keys?

I have a car with such a keyless entry system. My dad saw a report about those ADAC findings on TV and he had an idea which works: By placing the key in a steel can like the one above, the car does ...
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49 votes
Accepted

Phones broadcast the SSIDs of all networks they have ever connected to. How can these be obtained by an attacker?

Fairly easy to be honest, all you need is to do is listen for Probe Requests. There is a nice blog explaining how to go about setting up a computer with BT5 to listen for them here. With a networking ...
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  • 4,374
46 votes
Accepted

Why do coffee shops not use WPA/WPA2? Would it solve many problems if they did?

Instead of continuing in the comments, I think I will just answer your real question, which I understand to be - why is using WPA/WPA2 Personal with a public SSID and Passphrase not more secure than ...
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  • 2,926
46 votes

Does pressing a car remote many times offer denial of service attack for rolling codes?

A typical rolling code fob from a decade ago which used a 64-bit payload would unlock if it received one code that was within 16 of what it was expecting, or two consecutive codes that were within ...
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  • 2,029
40 votes

How would you detect an Evil Twin attack, especially in a new environment?

They're both evil. You shouldn't be connecting to any "Free Public Wifi" without assuming that all your unencrypted traffic will be monitored and modified. The best solution is to not connect to ...
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  • 1,194
38 votes
Accepted

What is the best home wireless network encryption algorithm to use?

From a security perspective, I think you are asking the wrong question. WPA2 is the basic answer. But it's entirely incomplete! A more complete answer will view WPA2 as one component of your wireless ...
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  • 434
29 votes

Why wasn't the KRACK exploit discovered sooner?

The paper describing KRACK discusses this very issue in section 6.6. A couple of points: There were ambiguities in the specification. Also formal proofs of specification are based on a model of the ...
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28 votes

Company claims hardwire connections are a security issue

It really depends on how they have set up their network, so we can only speculate. But I can provide a similar anecdote. My local library has a wifi that you can log into using your library card. ...
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27 votes

What is the best home wireless network encryption algorithm to use?

In a nutshell, WPA2 is currently the most secure wireless security scheme. Personal and Enterprise It supports two main modes of authentication, known as WPA2-Personal and WPA2-Enterprise. The ...
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  • 2,220
26 votes

Is UPnP still insecure?

Why is/was UPnP insecure anyway? UPnP's bad name comes from implementation issues found in 2011-2013. It's like saying email is insecure and should be disabled because someone found a common issue in ...
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  • 31.8k
24 votes
Accepted

How would you detect an Evil Twin attack, especially in a new environment?

Traditionally there hasnt been an easy user-oriented method to detect evil twin attacks. Most attempts to detect an evil twin attack (ETA) are geared towards the administrator of a network where they ...
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24 votes

Does pressing a car remote many times offer denial of service attack for rolling codes?

The problem with the attack as you're describing it is that it's glossing over a lot of details about how keyless entry and start systems work, and details about built-in backup systems, some of which ...
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  • 534
24 votes

How to reduce/mitigate the degree to which a Starlink terminal user in a war zone is giving their position in real time?

Starlink terminals are different from your average satellite phone in one important regard: their antenna is directional. It is a phased array. This has two important consequences: The total radio ...
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  • 3,395
23 votes

How would you detect an Evil Twin attack, especially in a new environment?

Tell the barrista/clerk/etc the wifi has gone down, can they reboot or power cycle the router? Most people will happily do so, bringing the AP down for a moment, and exposing the evil twin router in ...
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22 votes
Accepted

EAP-TLS vs EAP-TTLS vs EAP-PEAP

On EAP-TLS you are right, both sides require a certificate. With a client-side certificate, a compromised password is not enough to break into EAP-TLS enabled systems because the intruder still needs ...
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21 votes
Accepted

How to patch "keyless entry" car keys?

If you truly fear an RFID proximity relay attack, such that you would keep the key fob in a Faraday cage in your pocket, you must recognize that you will be giving up all the convenience of proximity, ...
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  • 33.5k
21 votes

How to reduce/mitigate the degree to which a Starlink terminal user in a war zone is giving their position in real time?

In another conflict, some people have allegedly been tracked and killed due their use of satellite phones or internet. One mitigation is to separate uplink location and site where the connection is ...
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20 votes

Trying to keep high school students out of the Wi-Fi network

Ethernet Before I get flamed by everyone who says iPads don't have ethernet ports, this is simply a single layer of "security". In most cases teachers should be able to use their laptops with a ...
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  • 763
20 votes

Is UPnP still insecure?

Yes, UPnP is by design insecure. UPnP is a protocol designed to automatically open ports in a firewall to allow an outsider to access a hosted server on a local machine that is protected by said ...
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19 votes

Why do coffee shops not use WPA/WPA2? Would it solve many problems if they did?

You're missing the bigger question: why? Encryption adds greatly to the coffee shop's cost. There are small one-time costs incurred when someone has to configure the access points, assign ...
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  • 33.5k
19 votes

Trying to keep high school students out of the Wi-Fi network

If passwords are leaking like that, you may have a bigger problem than restricting Wifi access. It sounds as if the kids could do almost anything a teacher can do (including manipulate exam results?) ...
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