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239 votes
Accepted

Does pressing a car remote many times offer denial of service attack for rolling codes?

it is possible to render a key fob useless by pressing the button at least 256 times while out of the range of the car. Not useless, but desynchronized. Any car will allow you to re-synchronize, and ...
ThoriumBR's user avatar
  • 54.6k
202 votes
Accepted

Why wasn't the KRACK exploit discovered sooner?

The 802.11 specification that describes WPA2 (802.11i) is behind a paywall, and was designed by a few key individuals at the IEEE. The standard was reviewed by engineers, not by cryptographers. The ...
Polynomial's user avatar
  • 135k
200 votes
Accepted

Company claims hardwire connections are a security issue

Warning: Conjecture, because none of us know their actual setup. It is very likely that the organization has their own network, which is hard-wired, as well as a guest network, which is wireless-only....
gowenfawr's user avatar
  • 73k
173 votes
Accepted

Consequences of the WPA2 KRACK attack

Citing the relevant parts from https://www.krackattacks.com: Who is vulnerable? Both clients and access points are listed in the paper as being vulnerable. See the tables 1 and 2 on pages 5 and 8 ...
Luc's user avatar
  • 33k
91 votes
Accepted

How safe are wifi enabled talking toys?

Be very, very careful. It's not KRACK that is the problem, it is a lax attitude to security and privacy in general. So called "smart" consumer products can often be hijacked, accessed from ...
Anders's user avatar
  • 65.7k
70 votes

Why wasn't the KRACK exploit discovered sooner?

In some sense, it feels like this should have been obvious. Remember Heartbleed, Shellshock, POODLE, TLS Triple Handshake attack, "goto fail", ... ? In hindsight, most of these problems seem to be ...
Steffen Ullrich's user avatar
48 votes

Does pressing a car remote many times offer denial of service attack for rolling codes?

A typical rolling code fob from a decade ago which used a 64-bit payload would unlock if it received one code that was within 16 of what it was expecting, or two consecutive codes that were within ...
supercat's user avatar
  • 2,059
29 votes

Why wasn't the KRACK exploit discovered sooner?

The paper describing KRACK discusses this very issue in section 6.6. A couple of points: There were ambiguities in the specification. Also formal proofs of specification are based on a model of the ...
Dale Wilson's user avatar
28 votes

Company claims hardwire connections are a security issue

It really depends on how they have set up their network, so we can only speculate. But I can provide a similar anecdote. My local library has a wifi that you can log into using your library card. ...
Mike Ounsworth's user avatar
27 votes
Accepted

EAP-TLS vs EAP-TTLS vs EAP-PEAP

On EAP-TLS you are right, both sides require a certificate. With a client-side certificate, a compromised password is not enough to break into EAP-TLS enabled systems because the intruder still needs ...
OscarAkaElvis's user avatar
26 votes

Is UPnP still insecure?

Why is/was UPnP insecure anyway? UPnP's bad name comes from implementation issues found in 2011-2013. It's like saying email is insecure and should be disabled because someone found a common issue in ...
Luc's user avatar
  • 33k
26 votes

Does pressing a car remote many times offer denial of service attack for rolling codes?

The problem with the attack as you're describing it is that it's glossing over a lot of details about how keyless entry and start systems work, and details about built-in backup systems, some of which ...
dwizum's user avatar
  • 554
25 votes

How to reduce/mitigate the degree to which a Starlink terminal user in a war zone is giving their position in real time?

Starlink terminals are different from your average satellite phone in one important regard: their antenna is directional. It is a phased array. This has two important consequences: The total radio ...
fraxinus's user avatar
  • 3,568
22 votes

How to reduce/mitigate the degree to which a Starlink terminal user in a war zone is giving their position in real time?

In another conflict, some people have allegedly been tracked and killed due their use of satellite phones or internet. One mitigation is to separate uplink location and site where the connection is ...
commentswithoutregisteringpls's user avatar
15 votes

How safe are wifi enabled talking toys?

It really depends on your threat model. I wouldn't be particularly worried about a particular sexual predator in your local area having the technical skills necessary to utilize Krack to inject voice ...
AJ Henderson's user avatar
  • 42.2k
14 votes
Accepted

WPA3 announced. Really needed?

According to The Hacker News, here are major improvements : WPA3 protocol strengthens user privacy in open networks through individualised data encryption. WPA3 protocol will also protect against ...
Soufiane Tahiri's user avatar
13 votes

Consequences of the WPA2 KRACK attack

What are the real-world consequences of these attacks for users and owners of wireless networks Already a great answer here, but thought I would add my viewpoint to a part of it. There have been a ...
YLearn's user avatar
  • 4,027
12 votes

How safe are wifi enabled talking toys?

Welcome to the Internet of Things(IoT). This is a... thing. Therefore, it can be assimilated Mirai is a type of malware that automatically finds Internet of Things devices to infect and conscripts ...
Machavity's user avatar
  • 3,798
11 votes
Accepted

Is WPA2-Enterprise affected by the KRACK attack?

Yes it is exploitable. WPA Enterprise still relies on a 4-way handshake. The main difference between enterprise and non enterprise is how the client is authenticated, which is not the same as how the ...
RibaldEddie's user avatar
11 votes

Company claims hardwire connections are a security issue

I'm going to come at this from a network-engineering point-of-view (full disclosure: CCNA / N+, I work on enterprise-level network systems which include complex topics that we'll discuss here, as well ...
Der Kommissar's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

How do rolling code fobs and receivers synchronise?

Keeloq is used in many but not all key fobs/garage door openers. This article is writen by microchip who created keeloq Introduction to Ultimate KEELOQ Technology. tl;dr The remote(key fob/garage ...
silverduck's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

What's the difference between pixie attack and other attacks on WPS?

Pixie works by exploiting weaknesses in the generation of the E-S1 and E-S2 nonces which are used to produce the enrollee hash, as described in the Pixie Dust Attack. Traditional attacks attack the ...
Polynomial's user avatar
  • 135k
9 votes
Accepted

How does one go about building a system with which to Van Eck Phreak?

What you're really talking about here is unintended electromagnetic emissions, and that goes way outside of the scope of grabbing monitor data via EM. The main thing you're going to want to look at ...
Polynomial's user avatar
  • 135k
9 votes

Company claims hardwire connections are a security issue

Looks like this is solved, but I wanted to inject discussion of "Wireless AP Isolation" which is a one-button click on most vendors' small-to-mid scale deployments such as small schools and hotels. I ...
dnavinci's user avatar
9 votes

How to reduce/mitigate the degree to which a Starlink terminal user in a war zone is giving their position in real time?

Apart from the Starlink uplink and satellite aerial, some relatively cheap components would let you use it at a distance. Safest would be a length of multimode fibre, and a transceiver at both ends. ...
nigel222's user avatar
  • 219
7 votes
Accepted

How might the BBC snoop on wi-fi usage?

There's a number of possible aspects at play here. First up as @gegenbeispiel says it could just be a bluff, however lets consider the possibilities if it's not. Unencrypted wireless. Obvioulsy if ...
Rory McCune's user avatar
  • 62.4k
7 votes

How to setup a Virtual Wireless Router?

You can! Linux has a pretty versatile WiFi driver framework for WiFi cards that do most of the WiFi handling in software (most of the cards these days). A top of that framework (mac80211) the ...
Marcus Müller's user avatar
7 votes

How safe are wifi enabled talking toys?

This is pretty much the same kind of toy as CloudPets. Those were toys that allowed talking with the children (toy) by using a mobile app. The security was terrible. It turned out that both the user ...
Ángel's user avatar
  • 19k
7 votes

WPA3 announced. Really needed?

Anybody knows exactly what is new? features, security improvements, etc... From what I have been able to gather so far, it appears to be a couple of required new features and a couple of optional ...
YLearn's user avatar
  • 4,027
7 votes
Accepted

What does a VPN NOT protect me from?

The VPN connection will not protect you from other devices attempting to connect to your device. The VPN will encrypt your network transmissions. If your friend states that he has noticed port scans ...
waltonob's user avatar
  • 399

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