5

For security reasons, it is regularly recommended to disable Javascript in Adobe Acrobat Reader. When it becomes strictly needed, Acrobat Reader will show a popup allowing to enable Javascript on a case-per-case basis. Moreover, other safety measures may include to: Use a less widely used and lighter PDF reader when Adobe Acrobat specific functionalities ...


4

"Safe" in Information Security means "the level of risk associated with this activity is one I am prepared to accept". There are risks in opening any potentially malicious file; and as with any risk, you either treat it, terminate it, tolerate it, or transfer it. With PDF files, most people do a mixture of terminate and tolerate, by which I mean they try to ...


2

Zip bombs are harmless if you don't extract them. Antivirus software will go through them a file at a time. You don't even need malice to get this effect - lots of poorly coded websites cause browsers to freeze or crash. The defense is described in your link: cap the memory allocated to a parser thread and have it stop once the limit is reached. An anecdote:...


2

You can crash-bomb IE11 visitors for example, by sending back a GZIP-bomb: https://blog.haschek.at/post/f2fda DOS of a webservers with bad GZIP - You can send a GZIP-bomb as post-request. You can DOS bad-quality anti-virus/-software You can DOS vulnerability scanners You can DOS bad email servers.


2

Most antivirus are able to detect zip bombs. In this modern day. Zip bombs doesn't cause much effect or not at all to systems. Antivirus scans 3 downlevel usually unless you changed the settings so Zip bombs don't cause AV to crash therefore does not "create" a scenario where AV crashed and opportunity arises for malware to infect the system. System ...


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