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58

The SHA-3 hash competition was an open process by which the NIST defined a new standard hash function (standard for US federal usages, but things are such that this will probably become a worldwide de facto standard). The process was initiated in 2007. At that time, a number of weaknesses and attacks had been found on the predecessors of the SHA-2 functions (...


50

"Best" is rather subjective - it depends on your requirements. That said, I'll give you a general overview of each mode. ECB - Electronic Code Book. This mode is the simplest, and transforms each block separately. It just needs a key and some data, with no added extras. Unfortunately it sucks - for a start, identical plaintext blocks get encrypted into ...


10

There's at least one usage for which SHA-2 is seemingly better than SHA-3 and that's key stretching. SHA-3 was designed to be very efficient in hardware but is relatively slow in software. SHA-3 takes about double the time compared to SHA-2 to run in software and about a quarter of the time to run in hardware. Since SHA-3 takes double the time to run in ...


10

There is nothing more secure than "secure". An attacker who can break it upfront, because it has "only" 128-bit security, is an attacker who has way more available computing power than all computers on Earth taken together (even including smartphones and coffee machines). It is implausible that such an attacker would swoop down so low as to bother breaking ...


10

The current version of PCI DSS is 3.2, and in section 8.2.4 it requires users to change their passwords every 90 days. Section 8.2.5 requires that passwords must not be the same as any of the four previous passwords (note that it does not prescribe how this is to be accomplished; the standard does not specifically state the "storage of hashes" is required.) ...


8

In general, DISA STIGs are more stringent than CIS Benchmarks. Keep in mind that with STIGs, what exact configurations are required depends on the classification of the system based on Mission Assurance Category (I-III) and Confidentiality Level (Public-Classified), giving you nine different possible combinations of configuration requirements. CIS usually ...


8

It depends on how you’re communicating with the client. NIST recommends the following during the enrollment process when it’s considered a part of the authentication process; which I would consider equivalent to the password reset process. Also note these are maximum values, you may certainly use shorter intervals than these. 4.4.1.6 Address Confirmation [...


7

NIST publishes a lot of test vectors. Including for HMAC (near the end of that page). In the file contained in the Zip archive, the vectors for HMAC/SHA-256 ought to be the ones with the parameter "L=32".


7

It took nearly a year, but NIST has released this bulletin explaining the update and also providing the updated document for SP 800-52 Revision 1. The answer to your question is expressed in the bulletin: NIST published the original version of SP 800-52 in 2005, but withdrew it in March 2013 because the guideline had not yet been updated based on the ...


6

On the 2nd of October, 2012, NIST decided what algorithm was going to be used to perform hashing. This was the Keccak algorithm. The Keccak algorithm is based on the hermetic sponge strategy. It's the new standard algorithm. We use standards to make have better compatibility. Keccak was designed by Guido Bertoni, Joan Daemen (one of the creators of AES), ...


6

Updated: see Ryan Fisher's answer to this question, SP800-52 revision 1 was later released, and it's double the size of the original 2005 version. It was withdrawn because it lacked information on contemporary TLS versions and known security issues (i.e to prevent misinforming, until it could be updated). It was not "retired" (or "expired"), it was "...


6

When they say that, they are probably referring to the number of published exploits and vulnerabilities for their product. If true, this is a very, very bad idea. I'm actually surprised it says that. Published exploits are not an indicator of a product's security. They only indicate how much and many people are looking for exploits. In the worst case, these ...


5

This certification is typically done through FIPS certification. The list of labs certified by NIST to perform FIPS certifications is here


5

With all the recent WIFI hacks, how we should configure our organizational Wifi security configs and version? You may need to be a bit more explicit with your concerns. You mention KRACK; I posted this answer about the impact of KRACK. Over a year since that post and there are still no reports of this exploit in the wild. KRACK is in most practical terms a ...


4

I haven't tested OpenSSL but I'm pretty sure it implements AES-CBC correctly. Your program, however, obviously uses different data, so it isn't surprising that you get different results. The test vectors are given out in hexadecimal. For example KEY = 0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 IV = 00000000000000000000000000000000 ...


4

Waking the zombie at my own peril and for the benefit of people looking to understand this control. I did a fair amount of research on the subject and was able to find a pretty definitive answer. Stay with me because it isn't short, but it's pretty definitive. As best I understand it, if you are an implementor of a cryptographic control module that ...


3

It seems to me that there are three major options: Add TLS on top of Winsock using SChannel; Enable IPsec using WSASetSocketSecurity - you probably need to understand quite a bit about IPsec before using this option; Tunnel your connection to the server using any kind of protocol (SSH and TLS are probably the ones most used). What you don't want to do is ...


3

Every FIPS 140-2 device must have a publicly available non-proprietary Security Policy document which is obtainable from the FIPS 140 program web site (CMVP - http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/STM/cmvp/documents/140-1/140val-all.htm). Although some Security Policies are far better written than others, there is a minimum requirement for these documents that should ...


3

I realize this post does not directly answer your question, but I thought I'd post it anyway as a "devil's advocate" rebuttal to Thomas's post. I fully agree with Thomas; there is no one who could give any reason to think you'll ever need more than 128 bits of security in our lifetime. That being said, Bernstein, the author of Curve25519, did co-author ...


3

Encrypting in-memory data stores/caches is generally not done because all the working data is stored in RAM and so will the encryption key at some point and if an attacker has access to the memory of the system, he will have access to the means to decrypt the data or have means to access the data after decryption so it is not providing any additional ...


3

Here are some important considerations: What is the reason that you're hardening against a given benchmark or guideline? Are you going to be audited? Is there a preferred route or route the your auditors are more familiar with? What tools will you use for self auditing? Do those tools have polices or plugins to audit your system against a given ...


3

One benefit I see of SHA-3 over SHA-1 and SHA-2 is that it is not sensitive to extension attacks. That means that protocols based on it (e.g. MACs) are inherently more robust.


3

Other strategies would not only be difficult to implement, they might be counter to the intent of NIST 800-63b. Fortunately, there are multiple blacklisting solutions, so you probably don't need (or want) another strategy. Here's my reasoning. First, to summarize from 800-63b, section 5.1, the portion about verifiers (such as passwords) that are directly ...


3

This is a bit of a guess, but on page 6 of the Derived Test Requirements for FIPS PUB 140-2, we have (emphasis mine): Required Vendor Information VE01.12.01: The vendor shall provide a validation certificate for all Approved cryptographic algorithms. VE01.12.02: The vendor shall provide a list of all non-Approved security functions. VE01.12....


3

Probably too late, but first, I feel your pain. And to top it off, authorizing officials (AOs) usually want the controls documented in MS Word, a static solution that does not match the requirements of today's rapid release CI/CD pipelines. So after writing my first ATO by hand, I vowed never to do that again. For starters, look at OpenControl which defines ...


3

It indeed is not ASN.1. (AFAIK all) The formats from X9.62 are replicated in SEC1 free from SECG with a curve point (which is the actual public key value, excluding metadata) in 2.3.3 and 2.3.4. The uncompressed point format, which you have, is just one octet 04 followed by the X and Y coordinates each as an unsigned bigendian integer of size determined ...


3

You can use the CVE API that Red Hat maintains. It has a lot of options to search for a vulnerability given a CVE or other parameters, you can even run a search by components with a range of dates (before and after filters). An example of the query that you may be interested in, will be something like this: https://access.redhat.com/labs/securitydataapi/...


2

The client proceeds as follows (I am considering only the encryption and signature steps as these are relevant for you): 1) Encryption: It generates a fresh 3DES symmetric key It encrypts the newly generated symmetric key with the public key of the server (using the RSA-PKCS1 algorithm, see EncryptionMethod algorithm) and places it into the EncryptedKey/...


2

One difference is the ease to find a reliable and automated tool to check for compliance. I believe Nessus has templates available for most of the ones you have listed, but some are dated. In any case, I'd choose one that makes it as easy as possible for you to check and stay in compliance.


2

ISO/IEC 27002:2015 Section 9) Access Controls Subsection 9.4.2 - Secure logon procedures "Implementing and using suitable authentication techniques, not disclosing sensitive information at log-on time, data entry validation, protection against brute-force attacks, logging, not transmitting passwords in clear over the network, session inactivity timeouts, ...


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