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You've run into a common problem in developing realistic exploits. Being a common problem, there is likely a solution. You just have to already know how to find it. In this case, look into the concept of a trampoline. Trampolines are small segments of shellcode that exist to redirect execution. It is useful in this type of scenario because you can redirect ...


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@gowenfawr's answer is a good place to start. However, while practical, many of the PoCs there are not going to be very verbose, since their goal is to exploit rather than teach. The linked socat does explain the steps in depth, but there are jumps in reasoning and assumed knowledge is probably left out; more of the "what" than the "why". ...


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Exploit-DB is a well-known repository for exploit code and includes a number of overflows. For example, here's one against socat which includes the steps required to exercise the overflow. Some exploits have more information, some less, but if you browse enough you should find the sort of shared exploit you're looking for.


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First of all, you are passing the bytes in wrong order. x64 CPUs are little endian, so you need to pass 16 48 55.. That places the zeroes on the right side of your string. You get one "free" null byte from the string terminating Null character, and depending on your situation the address you are overwriting probably has zeroes there anyway, so you ...


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For C coding interviews, review the following: Integer Overflows/Underflow: https://www.exploit-db.com/docs/english/28477-linux-integer-overflow-and-underflow.pdf Buffer Overflows (Stack/Heap): https://owasp.org/www-community/attacks/Buffer_overflow_attack Format String Vulnerabilities: https://owasp.org/www-community/attacks/Format_string_attack In ...


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I can write C program and execute as a common user, then is it possible to execute a buffer overflow attack to reset my password? No, because by definition, any program you can write and run will run as you. Any buffer overflow would execute code as you, not as root. You would want to overflow a setuid-root program, but without root privileges, you can't ...


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You need to have root privileges to modify your password. This can be done by supplying the passwd utility with your user (non-root) password, since that utility is setuid and automatically runs itself as root no matter who executes it. If it verifies that the password you gave it matches the password on record for that user, it will allow you to change it ...


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Python is a high-level language; it does not expose memory management to the programmer. Thus, you can't make errors when programming that lead to buffer overflows (unless any of your code is written in e.g. C/C++). However, the cPython interpreter itself could contain buffer overflows since it is written in C, but this doesn't happen terribly often and your ...


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