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If attacker runs malicious shell code by java script it may work. I asked a hacker how they hackd by links. He told me that they used javascript and run shell code for that task.


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While I am happy to accept other answers in case mine is wrong, I just came up with this answer by visiting the WSL website and watching seeing the video. While I expect to do more research into the differences between WSL and WSL2, the video states WSL gives developers the ability to communicate with Windows processes using AF Unix sockets, and that an ...


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WSL is just a compatibility layer to let Linux programs work on Windows. It isn't specifically a sandbox or security isolation tool. In general there's no security difference between running a Linux program through WSL or an equivalent Windows version of the program natively. Any security considerations you would have about native Windows programs likely ...


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If you're talking about distributing an application that connects to a SQL server hosted on the end-user system, then you just have the user set database credentials in a config file rather than putting it in the application itself. If, instead, your application's architecture is built around having the applications running on the (untrusted) user systems ...


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The moment you hardcore a password in your software, it's effectively exposed to anyone who can run and analyze this EXE file. It's a good idea to store it in a separate file and don't include this file in source code control, but there's not much you can do preventing it from being reverse engineered once the app is distributed. Not only can it be reverse ...


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On-premise Active Directory stores NTLM hashes of passwords in the NTDS.dit file on the domain controllers. If you have Domain Admin rights (or a backup of the domain controller) then you can extract the password hashes using a tool like NtdsAudit, and there are various other ways that you can extract them over the network with the appropriate privileges. ...


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The data on a BitLocker encrypted drive is not encrypted with the key in the TPM. Instead, the key in the TPM unlocks the volume header, which contains the bulk encryption key. This is a common construction in full-disk encryption (FDE) schemes. If the BitLocker volume header has been erased from the disk, the key used to encrypt/decrypt the bulk data has ...


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You are incorrect in saying BitLocker without a TPM is less secure, as the underlying encryption key is the same in all cases. How you balance protection and convenience in accessing, protecting, and providing backup archives of protectors of that key is what determines your level of security. You are correct that once the machine is running it is ...


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Use BitLocker with more than one startup authentication factors (TPM+PIN, TPM+USB, or TPM+PIN+USB). From the official documentation, BitLocker Security FAQ (emphasis is mine): What is the best practice for using BitLocker on an operating system drive? The recommended practice for BitLocker configuration on an operating system drive is to implement BitLocker ...


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Certificates alone don't contain private keys, but since you're talking about smart cards I presume you're comparing PKCS#11 with client certificate authentication, where the client certificate and its accompanying key is stored in the Windows certificate store. If you just install the certificate without marking it as non-exportable, all a user has to do is ...


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