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If you're running windows 10, other articles have suggested the cause is actually Windows Update glitching out. My laptop's Microsoft functionality is corrupted, though, so I'm not sure if the solution of updating will actually fix it, but I figured I'd throw this out there for other potential wanderers of the forum. I have the same problem, but mine aren't ...


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You assume that it's a software difference that enabled the Win10 box to survive. But the devices that fell have much reduced hardware. You likely just flooded the CPU/memory of the IoT devices and tablets. They are not designed for even small levels of direct traffic to them. A Windows laptop is. When playing with network traffic you need to run packet ...


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But, it seems Windows does not allow modifying mac addresses to universal ones (i.e., UAA's) (...) What is the reason for this restriction? Are there security implications if this was not the case? Marginal implications, but only if you consider changing a MAC address to be a security problem. Whilst it's not expected to happen frequently, it can happen and ...


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It is difficult to answer this question, because we don't have any insights on the way of thought of those at MicroSoft. However, as you said, there are two types of MAC's: a universally-administered address (UAA) and a locally-administered address (LAA). UAAs get the MAC-ID from the vendor; it contains the vendor's OUI. Although you can, you should never ...


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You can't fix MSCHAPv2; it's fundamentally dependent on the security of two independently-computable DES keys, which is... not quite trivial to brute-force at home but is doable in a day or less with a surprisingly cheap amount of hardware or even AWS time. It's not an implementation bug (which could be fixed); any implementation that conforms to the ...


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You can try using Mimikatz on the target machine to extract the administrator's password. If there is an AV try obfuscating the Mimikatz code. And then execute the reverse shell using 'runas'.


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It is a security risk, as Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) is obsolete with many well known security issues. Thorough explanations from Bruce Schneier's research: Cryptanalysis of Microsoft’s Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) Cryptanalysis of Microsoft’s PPTP Authentication Extensions (MS-CHAPv2) Easier to digest: Olivia Scott: The PPTP VPN ...


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open a powershell list execution policies with Get-ExecutionPolicy -List if LocalMachine is Restricted and you are not admin... ...you can change the policy locally with Set-ExecutionPolicy -Scope Process Unrestricted this allow you to execute .ps script stored on the machine... ...anyway still you can't run malicious content. So bypass AMSI with IEX (New-...


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Although, the question is answered, it doesn't really answer the question: when this exportable key option should be enabled/checked. Some time ago I wrote a blog post that talks about this topic: The case about exportable keys. In short, only user encryption certificates should be allowed for export with private key for backup purposes. In all other cases, ...


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Marking the private key as exportable gives someone with the permission to the private key the ability to export it into a PFX file. The ability to read the key and the ability to export the key are two separate things. Using the private key for signing or decryption is not in any way related to exportability. Windows exposes APIs that you can call to use ...


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Your Anti-Virus (Defender or any other software) sees a virus signature in your safe file due to: Your code is compiled by minGW. Many viruses are written in C and compiled in minGW to be small. Thus, AV sees your file as a small executable written in C wich uses minGW compiler call sequence. Thus, AV sees some of your code translated to compiler call ...


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