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The standard Windows feature for this is EFS (Encrypting File System). EFS transparently decrypts files on read, and re-encrypts them on write. It uses an encryption key that is randomly generated, and itself encrypted with a public key whose private key is encrypted with a key derived from your password. If somebody resets your password (either using an ...


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No. If you can access the system to remove the administrator password, then you can simply access the drive without the method/software to delete the files. Since you ask about specific folders, you can protect those by encrypting them with something like VeraCrypt and set a unique password for it. That way, if someone gains access to your system they do not ...


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BitLocker (in all uses) has a master encryption key which is encrypted using keys based on several "protectors". Common protectors for system partitions are TPM, passphrase ("PIN"), file-based key, and so on. BitLocker can also be temporarily "suspended" by writing a plain-text protector to the volume. Across all use cases, the ...


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