5

If it isn't in the spec it isn't in there. The question is if you need it if e.g. the NIST SP 800-108 KDF in counter mode is present. That's a fine KDF even if it lacks explicit extract / expand steps and salt. So I think you are only in big trouble if you need extract functionality; HKDF because of protocol compatibility. There seems to be HMAC, but that ...


1

You don't usually use the password to encrypt, you use it to derive a key. This way you can generate a key with high entropy even if the underlying password is low entropy. It allows you to create a key with the exact size as needed, no padding or truncating needed. It's better to use PBKDF2 and generate a 64-byte password than asking the user to type a ...


1

Hmm... the point in storing private keys in hardware devices is that the private key cannot be copied outside of the hardware device. That way it becomes a something you have, in the sense that it cannot be owned at the same time by more than one single human being. The rationale behind is that if the key is stolen, the owner should notice it quickly. As ...


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